Parliament pays tribute to Bercow as tearful speaker chairs last PMQs


This is your last prime minister’s questions. And as befits a distinguished former
Wimbledon competitor, you have sat up there in your high chair not just as an umpire
ruthlessly adjudicating on the finer points of parliamentary procedure with your trademark
Tony Montana scowl, Mr Speaker. Not just as a commentator offering your
own opinions on the rallies you are watching — sometimes acerbic and sometimes kindly
— but above all as a player in your own right,
peppering every part of the chamber with your own thoughts and opinions
like some uncontrollable tennis-ball machine [laughter] Mr Speaker, delivering a series of literally
unplayable and formally unreturnable volleys and smashes. Although we may disagree about some
of the legislative innovations you have favoured, there is no doubt in my mind that you
have been a great servant of this parliament – Hear hear.
– and this House of Commons. You have modernised, you have widened
access, you have cared for the needs of those with disabilities, and you have cared
so deeply for the rights of back benchers that you have done more than anyone
since Stephen Hawking to stretch time in this particular session. [laughter] As we come to the end of what must be
the longest retirement since Frank Sinatra’s, Mr Speaker, I am sure the whole house
will join me in thanking you and hoping that you enjoy in your retirement the
soothing medicament that you have so often prescribed to the rest of us. You have done so much to reform this
House of Commons, and our democracy is stronger for the way you have done it. You have served for 10 years. You have given real power to back benchers,
vastly expanded the use of urgent questions, which has been overwhelmingly popular
with all government ministers, and opened up the number of emergency
debates, which is even more popular with even more government ministers. And in the traditions of the great Speaker
Lenthall and others, you have stood up for parliament when it ​has to be stood up for and we
thank you for that because you have also carried that message internationally
in terms of the role of parliamentary democracy and parliaments holding governments to account. And as we hope to form a government
in the future, we hope to be held to account by parliament as well. Thank you, Mr Speaker. Can I, on behalf of those of us on these benches,
wish you all the best for your impending retirement and salute you, Sir, for the
way that you have stood up for the democracy of this house in order that at this time of crisis
we hold the government to account. We trust that you will enjoy your many
passions in retirement. You will always be welcome up in Scotland,
and if you need to visit a football team as an antidote to Arsenal
you will always be welcome at Easter Road to see the mighty Hibernian. Let me, Mr Speaker, wish England all the
best for the rugby on Saturday. – Hear hear. From the Liberal Democrats
benches can we wish you well and congratulate you on a decade particularly
as a modernising Speaker? From topicality of debates to promoting diversity
within the staff of the house, to reforms to support parents who are MPs,
you have helped to drag this institution out of the past so it can face the future. Before we proceed with a number of
statements that need to be made, I would like to thank the prime minister
and colleagues for their kind and generous personal remarks,
which are greatly appreciated. I want to thank staff of mine, past and present,
who have given of their time to be here today for the last prime minister’s questions
that I chair. All of them are people who have worked
with me for a significant period of time. We have had fantastic relations and
a terrific bond and I hugely appreciate the fact that they have bothered
to turn up on this occasion. And in particular, again, I want to thank
my wife Sally and our three children – Hear hear.
– Oliver, Freddie and Jemima for the support, stoicism and fortitude, which they have displayed
through thick and thin over the past decade. I will never forget it and I will always be
grateful for it. [Applause]

Labour’s Jess Phillips meets the man who attacked her constituency office


  Labour’s Jess Phillips has met the man who attacked her constituency office.  The high-profile politician, standing for re-election in Birmingham Yardley, came face-to-face with Michael Roby as part of a “restorative justice” scheme where offenders are introduced to their victims  The project aims to bring home to criminals the consequences of their actions.  Ms Phillips, 38, told the Mirror: “He was very, very nervous at first I had to tell him it was fine.  “He was really, really sorry for what he’d done and he was horrified that he might have behaved so poorly that he had frightened me and the people in my office    “I felt deeply sorry for him and I just wanted to let him off the hook.  “He was much more sorry than I expected him to be He was deeply ashamed of his behaviour.”   The meeting came six weeks after Roby kicked on the door of the Labour MP’s constituency office while shouting: “Is this the fascist party office?”  The 36-year-old claimed he went to the Birmingham office to discuss losing his job as a warehouse worker  But magistrates in the city heard he flew into a rage after discovering she was not there and began kicking on the door shouting: “Why are you blocking democracy?”  Ms Phillips’ staff felt “alarmed and distressed” and called police who found Roby in an “agitated” state  He was arrested at the scene where he admitted he “felt sh*t” about what he had done – but felt his MP had “not been supporting him ”    He pleaded guilty to a public order offence of using threatening or abusive words and behaviour  Roby was fined £40 and ordered to pay £135 in court costs and a £32 victim surcharge  Ms Phillips asked for today’s meeting through the charity Remedi – and Roby agreed  Flanked by officers and charity workers, they came face-to-face for an hour at a Birmingham police station  “What I wanted was for him to be able to say his piece to me,” she said.  “He got cross because I wasn’t here and it made him behave poorly, and he had misconceptions about the way I felt about him and people like him so he got cross and angry  “He’s had a tricky life and sometimes people mess up.  “I thought he deserves a chance to say his piece to me, as well as hear about how it affected my office  “It has deeply affected our ability to help our constituents because now we have security advice saying the office has to be shut – and I wanted him to know that in his actions he was sort of harming democracy ”   As well as Roby’s outburst, the pair discussed Brexit .  He revealed that as a Leave backer, he feared Remain-supporters such as Ms Phillips thought “people like him were stupid”  She told him: “Never once have I ever said anything like that, I hated it when anyone suggested my constituents were stupid ”  Roby and Ms Phillips discovered they grew up two streets apart in Birmingham and talked about places from their childhoods  “We are going to see each other again and work together,” she said.  “He has lost his job and he’s had other problems getting services, so I am gong to help him get those services ”

2020 RECESSION Why Its A PERFECT TIME TO START A BUSINESS.


(gentle piano music) – [Shaf] Are tough times looming? I think even the most optimistic economist will be tightening their belt. The economy grew 0.3% in July, easing fears of an imminent recession. But with Brexit chaos, services and manufacturing
sectors struggling and a weak pound, the
economic outlook isn’t rosy. So you’d be mad to start a
business in this climate, right? Wrong. A downturn can be the perfect
time to start a business and today’s Seven Hacks
is going to show you why. One, sharp focus. During tough times, we
all become hyper-aware of our incomings and outgoings. We know that our job
might be on a shoogly peg and we start to think about
what else we could do instead. If you fear for the boring,
nine to five office job that you’ve hated for years,
a recession can give you the focus and the mindset
to do something about it. If you change your job
to start up a business, the future is in your hands and not some faceless accountant’s. Two, a cut above. Your start-up has an automatic
advantage over competitors. Business loyalty can go out
the window during a recession as firms look around to get a better deal. That means they will be all
ears if you’re pitching. They will be shopping
around for a better deal so give them a reason to pick you and try to undercut rivals. Three, flexi-time. Unlike larger, more
established businesses, you can be more flexible when
you’re just starting out. Can bigger firms react as quickly as you? Make that a key part of any pitch. Bear in mind, too, that they
may have to make good people redundant and these people
will be looking for work. If you are growing quickly, a recession is a great
time to find top employees. Four, negotiate like a pro. In a downturn, things that
you need may cost less. Is warehouse or office space essential? If so, negotiate a deal. You are in a position of strength if a landlord is looking for a tenant. Maybe you can negotiate an extended period of reduced or rent-free. It’s the same with supplies. Stockists will be looking to sell goods so always try to get a good
price on things like desks, chairs and computer equipment. Five, interesting times. UK interest rates are at 0.75%. They have edged up ever so slightly since the last recession but are still low. That’s rubbish for savers but great if you’re borrowing money. If you need capital to set up, there are great deals around
and it won’t cost as much as it would if interest rates were higher. Loans and 0% credit cards are available. Six, fewer rivals. People generally don’t want to take risks during a recession, even although you and I know it can be the best time
to start a business. That means if you do start up, you have fewer rivals to compete with. There will be less funding available but if you’re bootstrapping, that simply keeps you in control. Seven, lean and mean. If you can successfully launch a start-up during a recession, just
imagine what you can do when the good times roll back around. Operating in a downturn
should automatically lead to good business practises. Your firm will be lean
with little or no waste. This will stay with you
when the market recovers and you can lift prices
and improve profit margins. So it can be tricky but a
recession can be a wonderful time to start your own business. And for all the help and advice
you need to be a success, subscribe to my YouTube channel; I’ll be with you every
single step of the way. (gentle piano music)

Is Labour Still Relevant to the North and Working Class? | Paul Mason


People ask: Is Labour still relevant to
the north or to the working class? Well, I was born in a working-class town
from a working-class background. Whenever I go back to northern England
I see that Labor in many ways, is the only source of hope for some
of the small towns and suburbs, that have been completely left behind. And indeed to be quite frank smashed
over the period of the last 30 years. They want their local rail
services to run on time, to not break down, to not be crowded,
to not be hyper expensive. They want hospitals and A&E
departments that work. They want places to live that they can afford. The real tragedy in this country, is so many people just don’t believe
any of those things are possible. You put your head down, you get on the
shitty train journey that takes forever. You go to the A&E and you wait for
hours and you think that’s normal. It’s not normal not in the 5th richest
country in the world. Let’s break out of the fatalism
let’s have the imagination. What kind of country
do we want to be? We’ve got a Prime Minister who
has prorogued Parliament, suspending it against the law,
lied to the Queen. Is even now playing fast and loose
with all the rules of the election, his entire campaign is based on lies. Then you got Labour, which is offering to
transform the country with investment. To try and reverse climate change
with a green new deal, to respect the norms and rules of
behaviour of a developed democracy, and whether we’re in or out of Europe
it will turn our face towards Europe. We won’t become a colony
of Trumps America, we won’t be subject to chlorinated
chicken, rat droppings in our food. You are kidding me! There’s a mouse in here! A mouse? Oh my god…no… Privatised NHS, so there is a big choice. And it’s a historic one because once it’s taken
I don’t think it’s going to be reversible. If Johnson wins, it could be the last
free and fair election we ever have. I’m Paul Mason, if you can please support
Double Down News by donating money. We need to be our own media
support Double Down News, by going on Patreon
and joining on there. This is part of the future of journalism
I hope we can build a big ecosystem, of alternative news sources Patreon
is one of the ways to do it, get your credit card out and help.

Boris Johnson tells business leaders Tories will end Brexit uncertainty


Last week, it was announced that
the rate of unemployment has fallen to the lowest level since 1974 and yet,
there is something very frustrating about this recitation of triumphs because
it is only half the story of an economy that is still not achieving what it could. Like a formula one super car, green,
super green, super car, of the kind of which this country of course,
excels that is only firing on half its cylinders with so much more natural energy
waiting to be unleashed. The country is being held back, let’s be clear,
by politics and by parliament, that for the last three and a half years,
has simply failed to discharge it’s basic promise made umpteen times to honour the
mandate of the people and deliver Brexit. And that is why we must
have this election now. I don’t want an election in December
and in the normal circumstances, nobody does but we have no choice. We must get Brexit done. We have to clear
this parliamentary blockage in this dynorod election. What this does is it gives, which I think
is what everybody wanted in particular – certainly what I was trying to achieve –
is it gives business complete stability and certainty about the arrangements
that we have with our friends and partners in the EU as we make the transition in January.

Parliamentary arithmetic ‘is terrible for Boris Johnson’: Market analyst


LIKE JACK DANIEL’S TO HARLEY DAVIDSON. MARIA: LET’S BRING IN MARKET ANALYST, SENIOR MARKET ANALYST, CRAIG, THANK YOU FOR BEING HERE.>>GOOD MORNING. MARIA: WHAT DO YOU EXPECT IN TERMS OF BREXIT SITUATION AND IMPACT ON MARKETS AN THE UK ECONOMY?>>WELL, WE ARE SHOWING POSITIVE IMPACT ON THE MARKETS, BUILDING OVER THE LAST WEEK EVER SINCE BORIS’ NORTHWEST OF ENGLAND A WEEK AGO, THE IDEA THAT WE WERE ON A PATHWAY TOWARDS POSSIBLE DEAL GOT PEOPLE EXCITED AND INTO THIS WEEK WHEN THE DEAL WAS ANNOUNCED. THE NEXT HURDLE, OF COURSE, PARLIAMENT R THEY GOING APPROVE THE DEAL, MY GUT SAYS NO. I FEEL LIKE THE EXTENSION, MOST LIKELY SCENARIO AT THIS POINT AN ELECTION AND THEN I THINK THE DEAL GETS THROUGH LATER ON THIS YEAR. MARIA: DO YOU THINK MARKETS TRADE DOWN ON MONDAY IF THEY GET A NO-VOTE TOMORROW? WILL THERE BE A MARKET REACTION?>>I THINK MAYBE WILL COME OFF A LITTLE BIT, WE ALREADY SAW IT COME OFF A LITTLE BIT YESTERDAY WHEN DUP CONCERNED THEY WOULDN’T BACK THE DEAL, MAYBE DIFFICULT IN PARLIAMENT, WE SAW THE POUND PULL OFF A LITTLE BIT, A WEEK OF SUBSTANTIAL GAINS, WE MAY PAUSE A LITTLE BIT BUT I DON’T THINK IT ALTERS THE LONGER-TERM, THE LONGER-TERM GOAL TO GET THE BREXIT DEAL OVER THE LINE, WE HAVE TO REMEMBER, AS WELL, THAT ESSENTIALLY ELECTIONS DO NOT GIVE DEAL, IF THEY DON’T GET A MAJORITY BETWEEN THEM, ALL OF A SUDDEN YOU HAVE A SITUATION WHERE THE OPPOSITION PARTIES COULD HAVE A MAJORITY, NEW COALITION AND ALL OF A SUDDEN BECOMES A POSSIBILITY BECAUSE THE REFERENDUM IMPACT AS WELL, THAT’S IN THE LONGER-TERM, WE ARE TALKING IN THE NEAR TERM YOU HAVE A LOT OF VOLATILITY AND KNEE-JERK REACTION, THAT’S EXACTLY WHAT THEY NEED.>>JAMES FREEMAN AT THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, OBVIOUSLY A LOT OF POSSIBILITIES YOU JUST WENT THROUGH SOME OF THEM, YOU’RE SORT OF BASE CASE IT SOUNDS LIKE YOU’RE EXPECTING A BREXIT DEAL, NOT THIS WEEKEND, BUT LATER IN THE YEAR AND I’M WONDERING WHAT — WHAT CHANGES IN THAT DEAL AS FAR AS BUSINESSES ARE CONCERNED TO GET IT OVER THE FINISH LINE, WHAT YOU SEE AS A MAJORITY BILL OR BREXIT?>>SO LIKE I SAID, IT’S THE PARLIAMENT ARITHMETIC THAT WORKS AGAINST BORIS AT THE MOMENT, HE CAME INTO THE JOB AFTER 2017 ELECTION, THEY WERE RELYING ON VOTES WHICH THEY LOST AS PART OF THIS DEAL. THERE WAS ABOUT 24, I THINK, EFFECTIVELY KICKED OUT FOR THE PARTY, VOTING AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT ONLY EXTENSION IN THE FIRST PLACE BUT THE ARITHMETIC IS TERRIBLE FOR BORIS JOHNSON, IF WE CAN IMPROVE NUMBERS IN THE ELECTION, SUDDENLY THE ABILITY TO GET THE DEAL THROUGH PARLIAMENT BECOMES MORE A LOT MORE REALISTIC. FROM A BUSINESS PERSPECTIVE, I THINK BUSINESSES AT THIS POINT ARE REALLY RELIEVED THAT THERE’S A DEAL ON THE TABLE AND A DEAL THAT THEY THINK COULD GET THE NUMBERS IN IDEAL SCENARIO, ONE THAT PROVIDES CERTAINTY AND ONE THAT INCLUDES DEAL FOR THE NEXT 2 YEARS RATHER THAN NO-DEAL BREXIT. I THINK BUSINESSES WILL BE VERY RELIEVED RIGHT NOW, OF COURSE, LIKE I SAY THIS TINNY TINNY POSSIBILITY OF NO-DEAL BREXIT, THEREFORE BUSINESSES ARE GOING TO BE BREATHING A BIG SIGH OF RELIEF. MARIA: CRAIG, ANY THINGS DRIVING MARKET THIS MORNING, WE HAVE A POTENTIAL OF CHINA DEAL, ARE THOSE THINGS DRIVING MARKETS AS WELL AND WHAT KIND OF SENTIMENT ARE YOU SEEING OUT THERE FROM INVESTORS?>>YEAH, IT’S HARD TO SEE OUTSIDE OF BREXIT WHEN — MARIA: OKAY.>>BUT OBVIOUSLY BIGGER THINGS HAPPENING IN THE WORLD, THE TRADE DEAL, SO, YEAH, MANY OTHER

How do European elections work? | CNBC Explains


It is one of the biggest democratic
exercises in the world. More than 350 million people across
28 European countries are eligible to vote for the lawmakers that sit here
in the European Parliament. But with 28 countries voting on different
days, each with its own electoral laws and procedures, it’s bound to get complicated. The first European parliamentary elections
took place back in 1979, when only nine countries were members of what was then called the
European Economic Community. Since then, that community has expanded into
what’s now known as the European Union, and voters head to the polls every five years
to elect the 751 members of the European parliament or MEPs. The number of MEPs assigned to each country
varies and corresponds to the country’s population. For example, the EU’s most populous country
Germany elects 96 lawmakers, while Luxembourg only gets six seats. In some countries like Italy, MEPs represent
a specific region. In others like France, they represent the
entire country. So now let’s get into how all of these MEPs
are actually elected. Voting is open to all EU citizens, and in
Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Greece and Luxembourg, it’s actually compulsory. This time around, the elections are spread over
four voting days, between May 23rd and 26th. Here in Belgium, citizens cast their votes on
Sunday, whereas the British and the Dutch have their say on the previous Thursday. The results, however, are kept secret until
every country has voted. Next, let’s talk about the method, or
should I say methods, that the EU uses to elect its representatives. Stay with me – this is where
it gets a little tricky. Depending on where a voter is based, they
could be using one of three systems. The closed list, open list or single transferable
vote system. What they all have in common is that they
aim to achieve proportional representation. That means the number of votes a party gets,
will directly correspond to the number of seats they receive in the European parliament. In the closed list system, citizens vote for
parties. Those parties have already selected a fixed
list of candidates. So if a party gets 20% of votes in a country
allocated 10 MEPs, the two top people on the party’s list will become Members of the
European Parliament. In the open list system, Europeans vote for a party,
but can also indicate their favorite candidate. This means voters can actually change the
order of the party’s list, therefore influencing which of the party’s candidates become MEPs. In the single transferable vote system, voters
can choose as many candidates as they like and then number them by preference. These votes are counted in phases. First, people’s number one preferences are
counted. Any candidate who passes a certain quota of
votes is elected. Any votes exceeding that quota are then changed
into the ballot’s second preference and transferred to the other candidates. If there still aren’t enough votes to reach
the quota, the candidate with the lowest amount of votes is eliminated and those votes are
transferred to the second preference too. This process is repeated until all seats up
for election are filled. One more thing. Some countries have
what’s called an electoral threshold which means that a party or a candidate needs to get
a certain percentage of the national vote in order to get a seat here in Brussels. This, in theory, keeps fringe or extremist
parties from winning seats without meeting a minimum level of widespread support. So citizens select their parties and candidates
at a national level. They then align themselves with other EU politicians
with similar views and form one big pan-EU group at the European Parliament. These alliances help stand-alone parties and
independent politicians gain more influence. The big elephant in the room is
of course Brexit. The European Parliament’s 751 seats will shrink
down to 705 once the U.K. leaves the union. The plan is to reallocate some of those seats
to under-represented countries like France, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands. There was another proposal on the table too
– transnational lists. It would have transformed some of those U.K.
seats into seats for a pan-European constituency. Its advocates, who include the likes of French
President Emmanuel Macron, say it would strengthen European democracy by forcing parties to discuss
European, not just national, issues. EU lawmakers have rejected the idea
but it does bring us back to why this year’s European elections are seen as so important. Pro-Europe parties have long dominated Parliament,
but nationalists and eurosceptics are gaining traction. Whoever sits in the European Parliament will
help determine what’s next in this economic and political union.

No-Deal Brexit Explained In 60 Seconds


On 31st of October the UK is set to leave
the EU. This follows the result of a referendum, taken
in 2016 in which the British public voted to leave the European Union. 1In order to smoothen the transition of the
UK away from EU laws and regulations, withdrawal agreements were tabled by both the EU and
the UK, but these were repeatedly voted down in the
UK parliament. What this has led to is a stalemate, in which
the default withdrawal agreement is no withdrawal agreement, Meaning that unless a deal is struck, the
UK will crash out of the EU on the 31st of October, thereby abruptly stopping things
like freedom of movement, The UK’s divorce bill of back payments to
the EU, As well as creating a hard border in Northern
Ireland. Supporters of no deal laud the money benefits
of such an arrangement, arguing that it would bring billions of pounds back to the UK and
drastically speed up an already delayed Brexit Yet opponents argue that the economy would
suffer badly in the event of a no deal brexit, as well as the rights of EU citizens in the
UK being affected. That’s my short explanation of a no deal
brexit, thanks for watching and please like share and subscribe.

Irish PM says Brexit extension would be better than no deal


What’s been put on the table
by prime minister Johnson is not supported by business
in Northern Ireland, by civil society and is only
supported by one political party, so I think there’s a long way
to go before we can get back to the position where we
have an agreement that actually carries the support
of the people of Northern Ireland and the people of the
Republic of Ireland as well. Democracy matters and any
agreement that affects Ireland deeply, of course, has to have the support
of people on both parts of the island. As I’ve always said, Brexit doesn’t
end with the UK leaving, it just moves to the next phase
of negotiations. So my preference is that we have
that agreement at the council in the middle of October. But if the UK government were
to request an extension, I think we would consider that.
Of course we would consider it. But I think most of the EU countries
would really only consider it for a good reason and that reason
would have to be put forward. But certainly, an extension would
be better than no deal.