ITW: Filling Out the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet—The Work of Byron Katie ®


Let’s fill in a Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. Statement number one: In this situation, time, and location who angers, confuses, or disappoints you, and why? Okay, what situation? I invite you to close your eyes and contemplate a situation where you were very angry or hurt or even slightly angry and hurt. So, identify that situation now and notice who you were angry with. Who was making you so angry or hurt you? And now locate, identify why… Why were you angry with that person? For example, 36 years ago comes to my mind. I’m standing in the kitchen with Paul. I’m so angry. I’m so hurt. He’s not listening to me. He had four massive heart attacks. I’m trying to save his life. I caught him smoking and he’s lying to me. I can see it so clearly. So, what was I thinking and believing at the time? Okay. I’m angry with Paul. Why was I angry? Ah… he lied to me. It just made me furious as I consider it now. I’m angry with Paul because he lied to me. So, identify yours and fill in statement number one on the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. So, statement number two on the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet: In this situation… your situation at that time, place, and location how did you want that person to change? What do you want them to do? What did I want from Paul? We’re standing in the kitchen. Let’s see… what did I want from him? I wanted him to hear me. 36 years ago how did I want Paul to change in THAT moment? What did I want him to say or do or be? I want Paul to get honest. I want him to apologize to me. I want him to admit that he lied to me. So, fill in statement number two. What were you thinking and believing in that situation, time, and location? When you’ve completed statement number two, move to statement number three on the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. And in that same situation, what advice would you offer that person? So with your eyes closed… really, really get still. Notice. Look at that person at that time and what advice would you offer them? For example: I see Paul so clearly, That image of him. 36 years ago as we’re standing in the kitchen and he’s not listening to me. Paul should hear me. He should thank me for trying to help him. Paul should apologize to me. So, fill in that statement with your advice to that person. So the next question on the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. Statement number four: In order for you to be happy in that situation… –and notice, in order for YOU to be happy in that situation– what did you need that person to say, feel, do? And then fill in statement number four. Statement number five: What do you think of that person in this situation? Notice your thoughts, the thoughts that you were thinking about that person at that time, in that moment, in that place, and write them down in statement number five. Paul is arrogant. Paul is cold. He’s uncaring. What were your thoughts? The thoughts you were thinking in your situation? Notice… and put them on paper. Statement number six. What is it in or about your situation at that time and that place that you don’t ever want to experience again? So fill in statement number six on your Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. So, that’s how to fill in a Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet. Filling in a Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet, it takes stillness… it takes quiet… it takes introspection. This work is meditation. So, welcome to the Judge-Your-Neighbor Worksheet.

Why Breaking Into the Chinese Beer Market Is Almost Impossible | WSJ


(rock music) – [Narrator] China is the largest beer market in the world and a particularly hard one to crack. (beer tab pops) Global brands have been desperate to sell more here but you know what? It’s really competitive. – [Steven] International beer giants, like Heineken, Carlsberg
and Annheuser-Beusch, are in an intense competition with the Chinese giants like Tsingtao and Snow. Last year alone, the country consumed 46 billion liters of beer. That’s about twice as much as in the U.S. The issue with this market,
mostly because it’s so competitive, is that it’s
really hard to make money. Consumers here can buy beer for about 30 cents a can in supermarkets. – [Chris] We’re in Yu Man Tang. Historically, this is a place with a lot of local business,
there’s a night market. Locals will come out here
to eat some street food and drink some beer at night. – [Steven] Chris Wong
has been selling beer in the region for the past seven years to wholesale and individual consumers. – [Chris] So a lot of people they enter into the China market, seeing a lot of people there they see a pot of gold. However, there’s a lot
of difficulties, right? People are used to drinking very cheap commercial lagers just as cheap as water. – [Steven] International beer-makers and start-ups alike want people to drink more expensive beer. Like IPAs, wheat beers or just regular lagers popped in fancy bottles. These drinks can make up to eleven times more money than the regular beer usually consumed in China. So, how do you convince people
to spend more money on beer? Especially at a time when the Chinese economy is slowing down? (hiphop music) First, you gotta tap into the culture. – [Rohit] We do about 1000
liters per batch every day. Production has been increasing
constantly every month for the last six years
since we’ve been operating. – [Steven] Rohit Dugar says that you can’t succeed in the market without understanding Chinese consumers. The Hong Kong based entrepreneur launched a line of craft beers,
called Young Master, that sit at the very
top end of the market. His beers sell for up to 20 dollars at bars in large Chinese cities. Something many brewers dream about. He says his rivals don’t
have a plan like his. – [Rohit] There are small start-up, much larger breweries, they are viewing China as kind of a quick win. The long-term success
will be for people who are on the ground putting
in fundamental effort. – [Steven] So Dugart has
developed a clear-cut strategy: Make his beers look and taste
familiar to Chinese drinkers. – [Rohit] The way we name our beers. The illustrations from local scenes. The aesthetics we use, everything is kind of informed by local culture. This beer is called Cha Chaan Teng sour. We added some salt-cured lime and it’s a very common
ingredient used locally. People mix it with sodas and
drink it in coffee shops. (upbeat hiphop music) – [Steven] Cheers.
– [Rohit] Cheers. – [Steven] Ah that’s good,
tastes like something I would drink, like,
after running a marathon. But not all Chinese consumers are ready to shell out 20 bucks for a luxurious craft beer. We asked Matteo Fantacchiotti. – [Steven] Hey, how’s it going? Who manages sales for Carlsberg in Asia, to explain how his company does the job. – [Matteo] Blanc is quite a citrusy beer. It pairs well with fine
dining group experience. – [Steven] Carlsberg sells
a wide range of beers and each one is marketed to
suit different occasions. – [Matteo] This is the
typical local beer in China. So very light, going very well
with hot pot and hot cuisine. – [Narrator] Here are
some of Carlsberg’s beers you can get at a grocery store. From the low end to the premium. The idea is to get people who’ve been drinking a Wusu for about a buck to upgrade to a Carlsberg. The goal would be to gradually move them all the way up to a 3
dollar Brooklyn lager. Beer-makers are doing everything
they can to stand out. Brands put their logo on the tap right here in front of consumer’s faces. Corona has figured out that limes are key to grabbing people’s attention and Chinese consumers see it as a novelty. It’s one of the key
reasons why Corona sales, in China, have surged about 25 times over the past four years. Where beer comes from is
important to Chinese drinkers. – [Matteo] Drinking more
premium international brands is a symbol of, first, you can afford it, secondly, you know what to drink and the local brand will
play a significant role because there is the pride, habit of, you know, drinking your local beer brand. – [Steven] An example of super local beer, Wind, Flower, Snow, Moon. Carlsberg has been acquiring local craft breweries like this one in Yunnan. Industry analysts say Chinese consumers are attracted by foreign brands, which has made some, like Budweiser, extremely successful in the region. Beer-makers want to appeal
to Chinese palettes. Remember that fermented lime beer? From that Hong Kong brewery? Well, there’s also pineapple flavored beer and some brewers say their
beers are made with wheat and clean water to give
off a healthy impression. (record scratch) So, I didn’t have to drink these beers while reporting this story
but I insisted on it. You know, for the sake of
journalistic due diligence. (inspiring operatics) It’s not bad, it’s fruity, pleasant. I can get used to it. These sales strategies have been used before in other parts of the world. – [Greg] We could’ve brewed our beer in a town you’ve never heard of. – [Steven] And actually
worked pretty well. – [Man] Let them drink beer, ha ha ha. – [Steven] But beer-makers say it’s even more important
to get them right in China because if they don’t plan properly, there can be consequences. – [News Anchor] Indefinitely, it’s not proceeding with it’s
announced public offering- – [Steven] For example, in July, Annheuser-Beusch INBEV, the
producer of Budweiser… – [Newswoman] China sales
for them is a big deal. – [Steven] …dropped its plan for what would’ve been the year’s biggest IPO. The company says it flopped because of prevailing market conditions. Investors worried that the strategy would not make enough money in Asia. The intense competition between Chinese and international beer-makers might scare board rooms and investors
across the world, but for Chinese drinkers,
that only means one thing, a greater diversity of beers. So consumers better hope that
companies keep up the fight. (upbeat hiphop music)

Growth, Cities, and Immigration: Crash Course US History #25


Hi, I’m John Green, this is CrashCourse
U.S. History and today we’re going to continue
our extensive look at American capitalism. Mr. Green, Mr. Green, I’m sorry are you saying
that I grow up to be a tool of the bourgeoisie… Oh not just a tool of the bourgeoise, Me from
the Past, but a card-carrying member of it. I mean, you have employees whose labor you
can exploit because you own the means of production, which in your case includes a chalkboard,
a video camera, a desk, and a xenophobic globe. Meanwhile Stan, Danica, Raoul, and
Meredith toil in crushing poverty – STAN, DID YOU WRITE THIS PART?
THESE ARE ALL LIES. CUE THE INTRO. [Theme Music] So, last week we saw how commercial farming transformed the American west and gave us mythical cowboys and unfortunately not-so-mythical
Indian reservations. Today we leave the sticks and head for the
cities, as so many Americans and immigrants
have done throughout this nation’s history. I mean we may like to imagine that the history of America is all “Go west young man,” but in fact from Mark Twain to pretty much
every hipster in Brooklyn, it’s the opposite. So, population was growing everywhere
in America after 1850. Following a major economic downturn in
the 1890s, farm prices made a comeback, and that drew more and more people out
west to take part in what would eventually be
called agriculture’s golden age. Although to be fair agriculture’s real golden age was
in like 3000 BCE when Mesopotamians were like, “Dude, if we planted these in rows, we
could have MORE OF IT THAN WE CAN EAT.” So it was really more of a second golden age. But anyway, more than a million land claims
were filed under the Homestead Act in the 1890s. And between 1900 and 1910 the
populations of Texas and Oklahoma together
increased by almost 2 million people. And another 800,000 moved into Kansas,
the Dakotas, and Nebraska. That’s right. People moved TO Nebraska.
Sorry, I just hadn’t yet offended Nebraskans. I’m looking to get through the list before
the end of the year. But one of the central reasons that so many people
moved out west was that the demand for agricultural
products was increasing due to…the growth of cities. In 1880, 20% of the American population
lived in cities and there were 12 cities with a
population over 100,000 people. This rose to 18 cities in 1900 with the
percentage of urban dwellers rising to 38%. And by 1920, 68% of Americans lived in cities
and 26 cities had a population over 100,000. So in the 40 years around the turn of the 20th century,
America became the world’s largest industrial power
and went from being predominantly rural to largely urban. This is, to use a technical historian term,
a really big deal. Because it didn’t just make cities possible,
but also their products. It’s no coincidence that while all this was
happening, we were getting cool stuff like
electric lights and moving picture cameras. Neither of which were invented by
Thomas Edison. I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but suddenly there are a lot more photographs in Crash Course U.S. History b-roll. So the city leading the way in this urban
growth was New York, especially after Manhattan was
consolidated with Brooklyn (and the Bronx,
Queens and Staten Island) in 1898. At the turn of the century, the population of the 23
square miles of Manhattan Island was over 2 million. And the combined 5 boroughs had a
population over 4 million. But, while New York gets most of the attention
in this time period, and all time periods since, it
wasn’t alone in experiencing massive growth. Like, my old hometown of Chicago, after
basically burning to the ground in 1871, became
the second largest city in America by the 1890s. Also, they reversed the flow of the
freaking Chicago River. Probably the second most impressive
feat in Chicago at the time. The first being that the Cubs won two
World Series. Even though I’m sorely tempted to chalk up the
growth of these metropolises to a combination of
better nutrition and a rise in skoodilypooping, I’m going to have to bow to stupid historical accuracy and tell you that much of the growth had to do with the phenomenon that this period is most known for: immigration. Of course, by the end of the 19th century, immigration
was not a new phenomenon in the United States. After the first wave of colonization by English people, and Spanish people, and other Europeans, there was a new wave of Scandinavians, French people, and especially the Irish. Most of you probably know about the
potato famine of the 1840s that led a million
Irish men and women to flee. If you don’t know
about it, it was awful. And the second largest wave of immigrants was
made up of German speakers, including a number of
liberals who left after the abortive revolutions of 1848. All right, let’s go to the Thought Bubble. The Irish had primarily been farmers in the
motherland, but in America, they tended to
stay in cities, like New York and Boston. Most of the men began their working lives as
low-wage unskilled laborers, but over time they came
to have much more varied job opportunities. Irish immigrant women worked too, some in
factories or as domestic servants in the homes
of the growing upper class. Many women actually preferred the freedom that
factory labor provided and one Irish factory woman
compared her life to that of a servant by saying: “Our day is ten hours long, but when it’s
done, it’s done, and we can do what we like
with the evenings. That’s what I’ve heard from every nice girl
that’s tried service. You’re never sure that your soul is your
own except when you’re out of the house.” Most German speakers had been farmers in their
home countries and would remain farmers in the US,
but a number of skilled artisans also came. They tended to stay in cities and
make a go of entrepreneurship. Bismarck himself saw emigration from
Germany as a good thing saying, “The better it goes for us, the higher the
volume of emigration.” And that’s why we named a city in
North Dakota after him. Although enough German immigrants came to New York that the lower east side of Manhattan came to be known for a time as Kleindeutschland (little Germany), many moved to the growing cities of the
Midwest like Cincinnati and St. Louis. Some of the most famous German
immigrants became brewers. And America is much richer for the arrival of men like Frederick Pabst, Joseph Schlitz, and Adolphus Busch. And by richer, I mean drunker. Hey. Thanks for not ending on a downer,
Thought Bubble. I mean, unless you count alcoholism. So, but by the 1890s, over half of the 3.5 million immigrants who came to our shores came from southern and eastern Europe, in particular Italy and the Russian and Austro Hungarian empires. They were more likely than previous
immigrants to be Jewish or Catholic, and while almost all of them were looking
for work, many were also escaping political
or religious persecution. And by the 1890s they also had to face
new “scientific” theories, which I’m putting in air quotes to be clear because
there was nothing scientific about them, which consigned them to different “races” whose
low level of civilization was fit only for certain kinds of
work and predisposed them to criminality. The Immigration Restriction League was founded
in Boston in 1894 and lobbied for national legislation
that would limit the numbers of immigrants, and one such law even passed Congress in 1897
only to be vetoed by President Grover Cleveland. Good work, Grover! You know, his first name
was Stephen, but he called himself Grover. I would have made a different choice. But before you get too excited about
Grover Cleveland, Congress and the President were able to agree on
one group of immigrants to discriminate against:
the Chinese. Chinese immigrants, overwhelmingly male, had been coming to the United States, mostly to the West, since the 1850s to work in mines and on the railroads. They were viewed with suspicion because they looked different, spoke a different language, and they had “strange” habits, like regular bathing. By the time the Chinese Exclusion Act went into effect in 1882, there were 105,000 people of Chinese descent living in the United States, mainly in cities on the West Coast. San Francisco refused to educate Asians until the state Supreme Court ordered them to do so. And even then the city responded by
setting up segregated schools. The immigrants fought back through
the courts. In 1886, in the case of Yick Wo v. Hopkins the United States Supreme court ordered San Francisco to grant Chinese-operated laundries licenses to operate. Then in 1898 in United States v. Wong Kim Ark, the Court ruled that American born children of Chinese immigrants were entitled to citizenship under the 14th Amendment, which should have been a duh but wasn’t. We’ve been hard on the Supreme Court here at
Crash Course, but those were two good decisions. You go, Supreme Court! But despite these victories Asian immigrants continued to face discrimination in the form of vigilante-led riots like the one in Rock Springs, Wyoming that killed 26 people. And congressionally approved restrictions, many of which the Supreme Court did uphold, so, meh. Also it’s important to remember that this
large-scale immigration – and the fear of it –
was part of a global phenomenon. At its peak between 1901 and the outbreak
of World War 1 in 1914, 13 million immigrants
came to the United States. In the entire period touched off by the
industrialization from 1840 until 1914, a total
of 40 million people came to the U.S. But at least 20 million people emigrated to other
parts of the Western Hemisphere, including Brazil,
the Caribbean, Canada (yes, Canada) and Argentina. As much as we have Italian immigrants to thank
for things like pizza (and we do thank you), Argentina can be just as grateful for the
immigrant ancestors of Leo Messi. Also the Pope, although he has never once
won La Liga. And there was also extensive immigration
from India to other parts of the British Empire
like South Africa; Chinese immigration to South America and
the Caribbean; I mean, the list goes on and on. In short, America is
not as special as it fancies itself. Oh it’s time for the Mystery Document?
The rules here are simple. I guess the author of the Mystery Document. I get it wrong and then I get shocked with
the shock pen. Sorry I don’t mean to sound defeatist, but I
don’t have a good feeling about this. All right. “The figure that challenged attention to
the group was the tall, straight, father, with his earnest face and fine forehead, nervous
hands eloquent in gesture, and a voice full of feeling. This foreigner, who brought his children to
school as if it were an act of consecration, who regarded the teacher of the primer class
with reverence, who spoke of visions, like a man
inspired, in a common classroom. I think Miss Nixon guessed what my
father’s best English could not convey. I think she divined that by the simple act
of delivering our school certificates to her
he took possession of America.” Uhh, I don’t know. At first I thought it
might be someone who worked with immigrants, like Jane Addams, but then at the end
suddenly it’s her own father. [buzz] Jane Addams’s father was
not an immigrant. Mary Antin? Does she even have
a Wikipedia page?! She does? Did you write it, Stan? Stan
wrote her Wikipedia page. AH. So, this document, while it was written by
someone who should not have a Wikipedia page, points out that most immigrants to America were
coming for the most obvious reason: opportunity. Industrialization, both in manufacturing and
agriculture, meant that there were jobs in America. There was so much work, in fact, that
companies used labor recruiters who went
to Europe to advertise opportunities. Plus, the passage was relatively cheap, provided
you were only going to make it once in your life, and it was fast, taking only 8 to 12
days on the new steam powered ships. The Lower East Side of Manhattan became the
magnet for waves of immigrants, first Germans, then Eastern European Jews and Italians, who
tended to re-create towns and neighborhoods
within blocks and sometimes single buildings. Tenements, these 4, 5 and 6 story buildings
that were designed to be apartments, sprang
up in the second half of the 19th century and the earliest ones were so unsanitary
and crowded that the city passed laws requiring
a minimum of light and ventilation. And often these tenement apartments doubled as workspaces because many immigrant women and children took in piecework, especially in the garment industry. Despite laws mandating the occasional window
and outlawing the presence of cows on public streets,
conditions in these cities were pretty bad. Things got better with the construction of
elevated railroads and later subways that
helped relieve traffic congestion but they
created a new problem: pickpockets. “Pickpockets take advantage of the confusion
to ply their vocation… The foul, close, heated air is poisonous. A healthy person cannot ride a dozen
blocks without a headache.” So that’s changed! This new transportation technology also enabled
a greater degree of residential segregation in cities. Manhattan’s downtown area had, at one time,
housed the very rich as well as the very poor, but improved transportation meant that people
no longer had to live and work in the same place. The wealthiest, like Cornelius Vanderbilt and J.P. Morgan, constructed lavish palaces for themselves and uptown townhouses were common. But until then, one of the most notable feature of
gilded age cities like New York was that the rich and
the poor lived in such close proximity to each other. And this meant that with America’s growing
urbanization, the growing distance between rich
and poor was visible to both rich and poor. And much as we see in today’s megacity, this
inability to look away from poverty and economic
inequality became a source of concern. Now one way to alleviate concern is to create
suburbs so you don’t have to look at poor people, but another response to urban problems
was politics, which in cities like New York,
became something of a contact sport. Another response was the so-called
progressive reform movement. And in all these responses and in the
issues that prompted them – urbanization, mechanization, capitalism, the
distribution of resources throughout the social order –
we can see modern industrial America taking shape. And that is the America we live in today.
Thank you for watching. I’ll see you next week. Crash Course is produced and directed by Stan
Muller. The script supervisor is Meredith Danko. The show is written by my history teacher,
Raoul Meyer, Rosianna Halse Rojas, and myself. Our associate producer is Danica Johnson.
And our graphics team is Thought Café. Every week, there’s a new caption for the
libertage. If you’d like to suggest one, you can do so in comments where you can also ask questions about today’s video that will be answered by our team of historians. Thanks for watching Crash Course and as we
say in my hometown, don’t forget to be awesome.

California Man Arrested, Charged With Working As Foreign Agent | NBC Nightly News


CRACK DOWN ON CHINESE SPIES WORKING AND LIVING AMONG US. SPIES WORKING AND LIVING AMONG US. SENIOR CORRESPONDENT LIVING AMONG US. SENIOR CORRESPONDENT CYNTHIA MCFADDEN HAS SENIOR CORRESPONDENT CYNTHIA MCFADDEN HAS MORE. CYNTHIA MCFADDEN HAS MORE.>>Reporter: A MORE.>>Reporter: A NATURALIZED AMERICAN>>Reporter: A NATURALIZED AMERICAN CITIZEN WORKED AS A NATURALIZED AMERICAN CITIZEN WORKED AS A TOUR GUIDE IN SAN CITIZEN WORKED AS A TOUR GUIDE IN SAN FRANCISCO. TOUR GUIDE IN SAN FRANCISCO. DESPITE RECEIVING A FRANCISCO. DESPITE RECEIVING A DEGREE IN MECHANICAL DESPITE RECEIVING A DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IN CHINA. DEGREE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING IN CHINA.>>THE CHINESE ARE THE ENGINEERING IN CHINA.>>THE CHINESE ARE THE NUMBER ONE>>THE CHINESE ARE THE NUMBER ONE INTELLIGENCE THREAT TO NUMBER ONE INTELLIGENCE THREAT TO THE UNITED STATES INTELLIGENCE THREAT TO THE UNITED STATES RIGHT NOW. THE UNITED STATES RIGHT NOW.>>Reporter: NO RIGHT NOW.>>Reporter: NO QUESTION.>>Reporter: NO QUESTION.>>NO QUESTION. QUESTION.>>NO QUESTION. THE RUSSIANS ARE UP>>NO QUESTION. THE RUSSIANS ARE UP THERE FOR SURE BUT THE THE RUSSIANS ARE UP THERE FOR SURE BUT THE CHINESE ARE NUMBER ONE THERE FOR SURE BUT THE CHINESE ARE NUMBER ONE AND ALSO THE NUMBER CHINESE ARE NUMBER ONE AND ALSO THE NUMBER ONE THREAT IN THE AND ALSO THE NUMBER ONE THREAT IN THE POLITICAL EDSPIONAGE ONE THREAT IN THE POLITICAL EDSPIONAGE CONTACT. POLITICAL EDSPIONAGE CONTACT.>>Reporter: THE CONTACT.>>Reporter: THE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT>>Reporter: THE CRIMINAL COMPLAINT UNSEALED TODAY READS CRIMINAL COMPLAINT UNSEALED TODAY READS LIKE A SPY THRILLER UNSEALED TODAY READS LIKE A SPY THRILLER WITH DEAD DROP AND LIKE A SPY THRILLER WITH DEAD DROP AND CODE WORDS. WITH DEAD DROP AND CODE WORDS. BEGINNING IN MARCH OF CODE WORDS. BEGINNING IN MARCH OF 2015 WHEN THE FBI BEGINNING IN MARCH OF 2015 WHEN THE FBI LAUNCHED AN ELABORATE 2015 WHEN THE FBI LAUNCHED AN ELABORATE STING OPERATION LAUNCHED AN ELABORATE STING OPERATION PLANTING A DOUBLE STING OPERATION PLANTING A DOUBLE AGENT INSIDE A RING OF PLANTING A DOUBLE AGENT INSIDE A RING OF CHINESE INTELLIGENCE AGENT INSIDE A RING OF CHINESE INTELLIGENCE OPERATIVES IN CHINA. CHINESE INTELLIGENCE OPERATIVES IN CHINA. TO STRING THE CHINESE OPERATIVES IN CHINA. TO STRING THE CHINESE ALONG, THE U.S. DOUBLE TO STRING THE CHINESE ALONG, THE U.S. DOUBLE AGENT FILLED SD CARDS ALONG, THE U.S. DOUBLE AGENT FILLED SD CARDS WITH NON-HARMFUL AGENT FILLED SD CARDS WITH NON-HARMFUL SECRETS CAREFULLY CURE WITH NON-HARMFUL SECRETS CAREFULLY CURE RATED BY THE U.S. SECRETS CAREFULLY CURE RATED BY THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. RATED BY THE U.S. GOVERNMENT. FROM TODAY’S GOVERNMENT. FROM TODAY’S COMPLAINT, PUT THE SD FROM TODAY’S COMPLAINT, PUT THE SD CARD IN A BOOK, WRAP COMPLAINT, PUT THE SD CARD IN A BOOK, WRAP IT IN A BAG, MARK THE CARD IN A BOOK, WRAP IT IN A BAG, MARK THE PACKAGE TO ED AND IT IN A BAG, MARK THE PACKAGE TO ED AND LEAVE IT AT THE FRONT PACKAGE TO ED AND LEAVE IT AT THE FRONT DESK OF A HOTEL LEAVE IT AT THE FRONT DESK OF A HOTEL LOCATED IN NEWARK, DESK OF A HOTEL LOCATED IN NEWARK, CALIFORNIA. LOCATED IN NEWARK, CALIFORNIA. ED PONG CAME TO CALIFORNIA. ED PONG CAME TO COLLECT THE PACKAGE IN ED PONG CAME TO COLLECT THE PACKAGE IN A SILVER MERCEDES. COLLECT THE PACKAGE IN A SILVER MERCEDES. THIS IS PONG HIDING A SILVER MERCEDES. THIS IS PONG HIDING $20,000 IN EXCHANGE THIS IS PONG HIDING $20,000 IN EXCHANGE FOR AMERICAN SECRETS. $20,000 IN EXCHANGE FOR AMERICAN SECRETS. THIS WENT ON FOR THREE FOR AMERICAN SECRETS. THIS WENT ON FOR THREE YEARS. THIS WENT ON FOR THREE YEARS. WHY SO LONG? YEARS. WHY SO LONG?>>YOU DON’T WANT TO WHY SO LONG?>>YOU DON’T WANT TO WATCH ONE DEAD DROP.>>YOU DON’T WANT TO WATCH ONE DEAD DROP. YOU WANT A SENSE OF IS WATCH ONE DEAD DROP. YOU WANT A SENSE OF IS THIS THE WAY THEY YOU WANT A SENSE OF IS THIS THE WAY THEY OPERATE AND PRACTICE? THIS THE WAY THEY OPERATE AND PRACTICE? AND IN THIS CASE, YOU OPERATE AND PRACTICE? AND IN THIS CASE, YOU CAN BECAUSE THE AND IN THIS CASE, YOU CAN BECAUSE THE INFORMATION YOU’RE CAN BECAUSE THE INFORMATION YOU’RE GIVING THEM IS INFORMATION YOU’RE GIVING THEM IS CAREFULLYCAREFUL GIVING THEM IS CAREFULLYCAREFUL LY CURATED.

WHAT? I’m FORBIDDEN from working in China if I get MARRIED?!?


so cross-Cultural marriages are quite challenging because there are some big differences in the cultures between Well: getting married in China and of course getting married in the West Welcome to another video! So why have I just put myself through this hell? Let me set the scene: I’m here in a back alley in Canton otherwise known as Guangzhou And I’m going to go to a wedding but it’s not an ordinary wedding you know I’ve been to plenty of Chinese weddings this is a foreigner marrying a Chinese Woman. So a foreign man marrying a chinese woman. I’m going to talk about the sort of cross-Cultural marriages in this episode I’ve been to plenty I’ve got some footage from one of my black friends getting married here as well So stick around we’re going to talk about what these marriages, and these weddings are all about Now the most unfortunate thing about being invited to a wedding in China is that you have to pay So you have to prepare what’s called a “hongbao” like this The going rate down here in Guangdong is 500 RMB If they’re your friend. You can go as little as 300, but that’s in pretty poor taste So it’s expensive This of course doesn’t really matter all that much because it’s a bit more of an investment than anything else For instance the wedding that I attended here was a good friend of mine and he actually had attended my wedding a few years ago, and he had given me a red packet, so It evens out and this is something a lot of people kind of count on. You know when they go To friends weddings, they’ll always be very generous But then when it’s their turn to get married they’re going to invite all the people, you know That they’ve been to their weddings and expects it of a sort of a fat paid paycheck or Windfall at the end of it So it’s kind of cool, and it certainly does help pay for the wedding So let’s have a serious talk here. There are a couple of myths I have to get out of the way I have to dispel them. Number one: I do get asked this a lot people that are planning to live in China, or maybe they’re dating a Chinese girl online and they have ideas of coming here and retiring here or coming here to get married and then settling down or perhaps coming here getting married finding a job you know and Living with their their new wife Forget about it China does just does not work like the rest of the world you cannot become a citizen. There’s no naturalization process I know for a fact that if you go to the U.K for instance or America if you get married to a local there There’s a process that you can go through in order to eventually become a citizen of that country and of course because you’re married to a local person you’re immediately given certain rights, and You know you can apply to work and all that kind of thing you can do it if your husband Or wife is say British or American however here in China They’re still very backwards when it comes to that kind of thing because China is a very homogenous, sort of society so if you get married to Doesn’t matter if it’s you know husband or wife you are only going to be given What’s called a family reunion Visa or a family visiting Visa Which basically means you’re allowed to come and visit your wife or visit your husband but you’re not allowed to work on that Visa you’re not allowed to you know do anything that a normal citizen would be able to do you’re basically allowed to come here on an extended holiday To see your husband or wife now the length of this visa depends it starts as low as six months it all depends on the nationality that you are and of course your circumstances whether whether or not or not you’ve lived in China before There’s all sorts of things they take into account, and then they give you say six months, maybe a year. I got a two-year Visa And that’s what I should say residence permit. I got a two-year family reunion residence permit because I’ve been in China for so long and they could see I had years and years of Work permits and things like that, so they were like: “Ah it’s not really a risk. It’s like at two years” I don’t know if it goes any higher than two years, but I’m pretty sure that’s kind of the max. Anyway so at the end of those two years I have to go and renew once again and You know I had to go in for an interview with my wife when I got this this family reunion thing and asked a bunch of questions and I needed to provide a lot of paperwork and my wife had to provide a lot of paperwork, and it wasn’t a simple thing to do but it was definitely a lot easier than getting a work permit, I’ll tell you that much. Thing is, like I said, I’m not allowed to work in China I’m not allowed to do anything other than just sit around and visit my wife So that’s why all my work is now on YouTube because I’m not technically working for a Chinese company I’m not actually working in China, I’m not taking a job away from anyone in China, so there we go So I just wanted to dispel that myth You can’t naturalize and become a chinese citizen and get a Chinese passport. You can’t work here however Taiwan and Hong Kong a difference now I know China will say that hong Kong and Taiwan are a part of China And I’m not here to argue politics, but what I will tell you is that both Taiwan And Hong Kong have different government systems And so I have a friend who got married in Hong Kong and immediately he was allowed to start working there You know he’s going through the naturalization process which takes about seven years before he can get his own Hong Kong I.D and passport and stuff and the same goes for my friend in Taiwan who got married to someone in Taiwan and Immediately was allowed to start working and you know settle down and all that kind of thing So I just wanted you all to know that If you’re planning on getting married in the mainland to a mainlander doesn’t matter man or woman, you will not actually have any rights, you will not be able to do anything here in China, which is incredibly frustrating you know other than visit your spouse. Are you going to be accepted by your Chinese fiance’s family? Well It really all comes down to money Unfortunately, and that’s because in China money is God I’m going to give you a very good example of this: I have an African friend named Elvis, and he’s a fantastic guy and his Chinese fiancee, stunning stunning girl, her family would not accept him because he was black And you know this is something that has to be addressed and that is that Chinese people are incredibly racist and discriminatory when it comes to anyone who’s not Chinese I mean, they’re probably one of the most homogenous nations in the world and they’re incredibly they’re just very racist and that’s because they have for so long not been exposed to the rest of the World So if you’re anything other than chinese, and I mean it doesn’t even matter if you’re Korean or Japanese or anything like that You’re going to face a lot of barriers They’re going to be a lot of things put in your way But let me just tell you his story: so basically the family took a lot of convincing But after he proved that he had enough money After he bought him a car and bought a house because that’s kind of part of the whole traditional family thing here is to to make sure you have a house and a car for your Bride-To-be and Also, the family because they plan to move in with you later Once he done all of that and proved that he had the income and that he was a decent straightforward guy They eventually accepted him and they got married and they’ve been happily married for a number of years now And in fact, I think she’s in Africa with him at the moment, so you know that’s just an example of how money is probably the most important thing when it comes to being accepted because if the family could overlook this sort of racist nonsense and you know eventually allow him to go ahead and get married to her it just shows you that’s What China is all about: it’s all about the money So if you’re a woman you really don’t need to worry too much because in Chinese society it’s all about the man and The man’s family they’re the one who has to provide. So as a woman marrying a Chinese husband He is expected to provide a house for you, a stable situation in other words, he has to have a good job and Preferably a car as well But the thing is as a man marrying into a chinese family you’re expected to actually pay a dowry in a lot of cases. Now of course China is getting more and more modern and if you meet a very modern girl and You know she may be very outspoken and very wise in the ways of the world you know you probably don’t have to worry about a dowry but if you’re marrying somebody from a traditional family Especially if they’re from a rural family you will be expected to pay a dowry And it really depends on the family, you know, if they’re over low state as you pay later They’re of a high status you pay more. I have a friend who paid 10,000 RMB to get married to his lovely wife and that was an absolute steal And then again, I have another friend who had to pay 250,000 RMB to his fiance’s family So you know it really depends I personally did not have to pay any sort of dowry to marry my wife but our circumstances are a little different you know Basically what I’m trying to say here is you may be stuck paying a dowry Anyway, let’s brush the whole money thing aside for a while, and let’s actually talk about some of the big cultural differences First thing I’ll do is if you’re a woman marrying a Chinese man: be prepared for your mother-in-law to Pester you non-stop to have a child I mean literally the day after you’re married you can expect her to be giving you self-help books on how to conceive and Pestering you about having a child and every single time you meet with your family the Chinese family expects that whole like: “When are you going to have a child?” question to pop up it’s incredibly annoying and it’s It’s probably probably one of the biggest bugbears of any relationship here is that the traditional Chinese family will almost want to force you to have children the minute you’re married from a man’s perspective It’s also very Annoying as well because they will every time you meet them be asking about when you’re gonna have a child but of course it’s Less pressure on on the man more pressure on the woman because if you don’t have a child they think something’s wrong And it’s usually you know you might not want to have a child, but they’ll think: “Oh they don’t have a child because they can’t it must be something wrong with the… with the bride” It’s silly remember that China is a still a very traditional sort of a country and Although I cannot be said for everybody because the younger generation are sort of changing But you know still as it is people my age and and even younger still have to deal with all those traditional mountains Be prepared as the man to pay for everything the responsibility is all on you for everything now of course Cultural differences are so varied and we’re running out of time in this video But it’s not a big deal because if you look through my channel I’ve done so many videos with my wife that will make you understand the differences between the two cultures But not only that on the ADV China channel We’ve done videos about getting married, had some pretty in-depth conversation and of course don’t forget my friends C-Milk is also married to a Chinese local and His channel has got tons of videos with his wife as well and although she did study overseas So she has a very sort of western mindset They still have to deal with the family traditional stuff and all that kind of nonsense, too So I absolutely suggest you go check it all out Can’t wait to see you guys in the next video I really hope you enjoyed this or found it useful. I know it’s a bit of a boring topic for those of you who are not actually in any kind of relationship with a chinese person, but thanks for sticking around and ‘Till next time, you know the drill, stay awesome!

China allows US rice imports amid trade war


♪>>FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER AND IN A SIGN OF POSSIBLY THAWING RELATIONS, CHINA HAS SIGNALED IT IS OPEN TO IMPORTING RICE FROM AMERICA. RICH EDSON IS IN WASHINGTON WITH AN UPDATE.>>GOOD EVENING, JON, AND THAT’S ACCORDING TO THE CHINESE CUSTOMS OFFICE, THE LATERS IN A — THE LATEST IN A SERIES OF GESTURES BETWEEN THE TWO COUNTRIES. THE U.S. RICE PRODUCERS CALL THIS ANNOUNCEMENT AN IMPORTANT MILESTONE IN A MORE THAN DECADE-HONG FIGHT TO SECURE ACCESS TO CHINESE CONSUMERS. IN A STATEMENT, U.S. RICE SAYS, QUOTE: AS WITH OUR ALL OUR DEALINGS WITH CHINA, THE DEVIL’S IN THE DETAILS, AND WE HAVE MANY QUESTIONS INCLUDING WHEN THE FIST SALES WILL BE MADE, BUT THIS IS DEFINITELY GOOD NEWS FOR OUR PRODUCERS AND MILLERS. CHINA STILL NEEDS TO ANNOUNCE A LIST OF AA PROVED AMERICAN RICE MILLS, IT’S ALMOST UNCLEAR HOW MUCH AMERICAN RICE CHINA WILL IMPORT. IT ALSO BUYS RICE FROM OTHER ASIAN COUNTRIES. THE U.S. AND CHINA HAD PREVIOUSLY RAISED TARIFFS ON HUNDREDS OF BILLIONS OF DOLLARS OF IMPORT ON EACH OTHER’S COUNTRIES, THEY’RE IN THE MIDDLE OF A 90-DAY NEGOTIATING WINDOW WHERE BOTH HAVE AGREED TO HOLD OFF ON INCREASES AND OFFER GOODWILL GESTURES. CHINA HAS SAID IT WOULD RESUME BUYING AMERICAN SOYBEANS. THAT NEGOTIATING PERIOD ENDS MARCH 1ST, THOUGH ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS HAVE SAID THEY WOULD CONSIDER EXTENDING IT IF THE TWO COUNTRIES HAVE MADE ENOUGH PROGRESS. CHINESE AUTHORITIES SAY U.S. AND CHINESE NEGOTIATORS WILL HOLD THEIR FIRST FACE TO FACE MEETINGS NEXT MONTH SINCE PRESIDENT TRUMP AND CHINESE PRESIDENT XI JINPING MET EARLIER THIS MONTH IN ARGENTINA. THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION SAYS IT IS CONFRONTING CHINA’S RAMPANT INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THEFT AND WHAT IT CALLS ABUSIVE TRADE PRACTICES. JON: THIS IS ONE OF MANY, MANY STEPS, BUT WE DON’T HAVE ANY QUANTITIES, WE DON’T HAVE ANY ORDERS. AT THIS POINT IT’S JUST AN OPEN DOOR, AND WE HAVE A LONG WAY TO GO.>>Reporter: EXACTLY, AND THIS HAS BEEN A NEGOTIATING POINT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA FOR A DECADE NOW. IT’S A BIG STEP AT LEAST SPECIFICALLY TO RICE PRODUCERS, BUT THEY’RE EVEN SAYING THEY NEED TO SEE MORE FROM THE CHINESE GOVERNMENT BEFORE THEY CAN ACTUALLY START SELLING TO THAT BIG MARKET. JON: THANK YOU, RICH. JOINING ME NOW IS FOX NEWS CONTRIBUTOR FRED BARNES. FRED, GOOD TO SEE YOU.>>THANK YOU. JON: SO THESE TALKS ABOUT RICE IMPORTS GO BACK MANY, MANY YEARS TO SPECIFIC DISCUSSIONS THAT REALLY PREDATE THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION. DO YOU SEE THIS AS A VICTORY FOR HIS ADMINISTRATION OR JUST PART OF A LONG, ONGOING PROCESS?>>WELL, IT’S PART OF A LONG, ONGOING PROCESS, AND IT’S BEEN CALLED A GOODWILL GESTURE BY THE CHINESE. I DON’T THINK THE CHINESE WILL BE BRINGING A LOT OF GOODWILL WHEN THE TRADE TALKS RESUME IN JANUARY. THEY ARE TOUGH NEGOTIATORS. THEY DO NOT WANT TO LOSE THE ADVANTAGE IN TRADE THAT THEY HAVE WITH THE U.S. AND SO MANY OTHER COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD. AND PARTLY BECAUSE OF UNFAIR TRADE PRACTICES WHICH THEY PURSUE. I THINK THE U.S. DOES HAVE SOME ADVANTAGES HERE. REMEMBER — [LAUGHTER] REMEMBER, THERE ARE TWO ISSUES THAT TRUMP HAS BEEN TALKING ABOUT FOR DECADES, AND HE REALLY CARES ABOUT. ONE OF THEM, OF COURSE, IS IMMIGRATION, AND THE OTHER ONE IS TRADE. AND SO I THINK HE’S GOING TO BE A TOUGH NEGOTIATOR, AND HE’S HIRED ONE TO BE HIS CHIEF GUY, BOB LIGHTHIZER, WHO IS, I THINK, TOUGHER THAN ANY OF THE TRADE REPRESENTATIVES THAT OTHER PRESIDENTS HAVE HAD IN RECENT YEARS. JON: THIS SEEMS LIKE SORT OF A BABY STEP TO ME, FRED –>>EXACTLY. JON: NOT A LOT OF MEAT ON THE BONE. ARE YOU WORRIED THIS IS REALLY FLUFF? [LAUGHTER]>>WELL, I’M NOT NECESSARILY WORRIED, BUT I THINK IT IS FLUFF. I THINK YOU HAVE THAT QUITE CORRECTLY. AND, LOOK, IT JUST LOOKS LIKE SO MUCH MORE THAN IT IS. I DON’T THINK IT WILL CHANGE, REFLECT ANY CHANGE, ANY SOFTENING IN THE CHINESE TRADE PRACTICES OR THE WEIGHT THAT THE CHINESE NEGOTIATE THAN WE’VE SEEN BEFORE. THEY’LL BE AS TOUGH AND MEAN AS EVER. JON: WELL, YOU KNOW, THE CHINESE ARE COMING OFF A REALLY TOUGH QUARTER ECONOMICALLY. DO YOU THINK THAT CHANGES THE DYNAMIC OF THESE DISCUSSIONS AT ALL?>>WELL, THAT’S A GOOD QUESTION THAT I DON’T KNOW THE ANSWER OF. YOU WOULD THINK NORMALLY WITH ANOTHER COUNTRY AND MAYBE ANOTHER ISSUE IT WOULD, BUT WITH THE CHINESE I SUSPECT NOT. I MEAN, TRADE IS SO CRITICAL TO THEIR STATURE IN THE WORLD AND TO THEIR SELF-ESTEEM AND TO THEIR WEALTH AND POWER THAT I THINK THEY’RE GOING TO BE JUST AS HARD, AS HARD A PERSON TO BARGAIN WITH AS WE’VE EVER SEEN. JON: THESE PAST FEW WEEKS THE CHINESE HAVE TALKED ABOUT PHONE CALLS OVER THE HOLIDAYS AND PROGRESS BEING MADE ON THE PHONES AND AN UPCOMING MEETING IN JANUARY. DO YOU FEEL OPTIMISM IN THIS PROCESS? IT DOES SEEM TO BE MOVING AT A MORE ACCELERATED RATE.>>WELL, IT DOES. OPTIMISM, I WOULDN’T SAY THAT, BECAUSE THESE ARE STILL THE CHINESE, AND THESE THINGS THAT YOU TALKED ABOUT — THE PHONE CALLS AND SO ON — THEY DON’T AMOUNT TO MUCH. IF ANYTHING, THE CHINESE, OF COURSE, RECOGNIZE THIS IS THE STUFF THAT’LL GET IN THE AMERICAN PRESS, AND IT’LL LOOK LIKE, OH, BOY, ALL OF A SUDDEN WE’RE GETTING ALONG THERE. THIS IS GOING TO WORK OUT FINE. I THINK IT WILL WORK OUT TO AMERICA’S ADVANTAGE, BUT IT’S GOING TO TAKE AN AWFUL LOT, IT’S GOING TO TAKE A HUGE STRUGGLE, AND BOTH TRUMP AND HIS NEGOTIATOR, BOB LIGHTHIZER, ARE GOING TO HAVE TO WEATHER A LOT OF CRITICISM FROM THE MEDIA AND FROM AMERICANS AS THIS GOES ON. JON: YEAH, THIS IS GOING TO BE A

Tariffs force US manufacturers from China



we begin this Monday with the economy as the world's the two largest economies are still brawling over trade now the us-china trade war continues and it doesn't look like we're getting any closer to reaching a deal regardless of what the past few weeks of hints have told us now China's economic growth slowed to its weakest level for in 27 years and there's no end inside of whether or not it's going to start going back up our tea ceremony today okra joins me with the details you know China's hurting their economy turning does that give them any more motivation to actually come to the United States and actually work with some of the deals that have been requested well there's no timeline just yet but Scottie we're going into the second year of the us-china trade war and the world markets are already feeling the aftermath this has led US manufacturers to shift their productions to countries just outside of China companies that make crock shoes Roomba vacuums and GoPros for example are moving their factories to other countries to avoid as much as a 25% tariff on some 250 billion dollar worth of imports from China even Apple is looking to diversify its supply chain and considering it making a move but some Asian countries are benefiting this includes Vietnam India Taiwan and Malaysia recording some sharp increases in exports the u.s. is keeping an eye on these countries and already Vietnam and India have a tariffs of their own according to the US Census Bureau imports from China fell by 12 percent from January to May of just this year this is the biggest decline since the financial crisis just a decade ago well that's the thing you know the we're talking about a lot of the things that are going on now Huawei has been at the forefront of everything Sarah and have this trade war are they making any headway xand how is that helping this conversation well Scottie The Wall Street Journal reported that the Chinese telecom giant plans to layoff hundreds of employees the layoffs are expected to hit Huawei's us-based research and development subsidiary future way the subsidiary employs 850 people in research labs throughout the US this includes Texas California and Washington State but it remains unclear how many people will lose their jobs some employees have told the journal that they were given an option to return home and stay with a company while others have already been notified of their dismissal Huawei was reached out to for comment and has not responded to the matter well and that's the thing Sarah there are other countries that are now following suit on this trade war two Asian countries are caught up in the feud as well that's right Scotty so Japan and South Korea seemed to be caught up in a trade war of their own where relations have escalated over just this weekend now Japan recently tightened restrictions on export of three materials that were used in high-tech equipment and they accused that South Korea of breaking some agreement Tokyo has questions Seoul's credibility and controlling their arms exports and dual-use items that can be used for civilians and military purposes they suggested that there may be illegal transfers to sensitive materials going from South Korea to North Korea and on Monday South Korean president moon jae-in urged Japan to lift these controls even did one-oh Japan's export restrictions have broken the framework of economic cooperation between South Korea and Japan that continued over a half century based on mutual dependence earlier today about 50 people gathered just outside the Japanese Embassy in Seoul calling for a boycott on Japanese goods now tensions have escalated between the two countries since earlier this year when a South Korean court ordered Japanese businesses to compensate South Korean victims for forced labor during World War two Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe a say said that it's the government's job to keep tabs on sensitive technology transferable to military users or not in fact it is a country's duty to carry out trade control for national security reasons within that Duty if another country doesn't keep their promise you can't have preferential treatment like for and some media don't report this properly but it is not an embargo it just means you can't have preferential treatment as you have so far so the two met late last week for talks but they failed to resolve the dispute no Scotty laughing the already sensitive market needs is another trade war and with no end in sight to the us-china trade war fears of a global economic shutdown and slowdown are on the rise Sara every time I think we take two steps forwards like what we saw the g20 we take two steps back and we're back to square one thank you so much there hey YouTube thanks for checking out our channel we hope you enjoyed the video we have tons of concept for you just like this for more of RT America's one-of-a-kind news and analysis be sure to subscribe and never stop questioning more