Sigma Technical discuss growing a business in Exeter


My name’s Mike Badley, I’m an engineer I run Sigma Technical and Luminous Show Technology. My background is in movie special effects. I’ve spent the last 15 years working on blockbuster movies. So, we got in touch with SETsquared and were introduced to Joe Pearce. We met with Joe for a coffee and he ran us through all the services that we can access. SETsquared introduced us to Spacetech. Sigma Technical went in with open eyes hoping to learn something from Spacetech. We came away with a great plan and a lot more confidence in what we are doing. Through Spacetech we got £5,000 of grant funding to evolve our concept and our product and following on from that we were able to access £250,000 worth of grant funding from Innovate UK. The robotics project we’ve been working on is designed to measure athletic performance. We’ve also been awarded a seal of excellence from Horizon 2020. We have a mentor called Stephen Moore, he’s an experienced entrepreneur. It’s really useful to have somebody with that kind of level of experience that you can access. Following the grant funding, we were able to take on a couple of employees and since then we’ve developed Luminous which is now doing very well and we’re now up to seven employees. We’re located at the Exeter Science Park, it’s a great facility to have access to it’s got meeting rooms, all sorts of different sizes of offices, so your company can grow without having to move. Whilst Sigma Technical has been developing its robotics hardware several opportunities have come along for us to exploit which SETsqaured have been instrumental in helping us with. We’ve created a spin-out company called Luminous. Luminous now sells special effects hardware worldwide.

Number of employed in Korea up 310,000 in July


The government released Korea’s employment
figures for July… an important barometer of whether the local economy is on a solid
recovery path. Kim Hyesung has the details. According to Statistics Korea Wednesday, the
number of people in Korea’s workforce was up 310-thousand in July compared to the same
month last year, thanks to a pickup in the manufacturing sector. “The manufacturing sector showed a turnaround
starting June. The manufacturing workforce increased in July
thanks to a base effect from last year, and an increase in exports of manufacturing goods.” The manufacturing sector posted 50-thousand
more jobs in July. Construction, education, and real estate also
added more jobs. On the other hand, services, including publications
and information services, finance and insurance saw the number of jobs drop. The employment rate increased slightly to
61-point-five percent. The number of unemployed also fell below the
one-million mark in July, the first time in seven months. The unemployment rate stood at 3.5%, staying
flat from the same period last year. But the youth unemployment rate increased
slightly to nine-point-three percent. With the number of young people who have given
up looking for jobs and the number of job seekers both on the rise, the real unemployment
rate for 15 to 29 year olds, a key indicator of perceived job market conditions, now stands
at over 22 percent. Kim Hyesung, Arirang News.

Superbolt Featured on Fox Business Network’s “Manufacturing Marvels”


Hi, this is John Criswell, welcome to Manufacturing Marvels. Bolts are a simple means of putting things together, but when their diameters are larger than an inch, tightening them is anything but simple… unless you’re using Superbolt. Founded in 1984 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Superbolt has revolutionized the bolting industry with its multi-jackbolt tensioner (MJT). This innovative tool achieves incredibly high preloads and accuracy by dividing the torque into multiple, manageable forces, therefore requiring only simple hand tools for installation. With Superbolt, the possibilities are endless — both in scope and application. MJTs replace standard hex nuts, practically making dangerous, time-consuming, and damaging bolting methods obsolete. Parent company Nord-Lock Group — headquartered in Malmö, Sweden — purchased Superbolt in 2011, further solidifying their status as the global leader in bolting solutions. Although the Pittsburgh office serves as the primary US location for the Nord-Lock Group, the company operates more than 25 offices worldwide, including a Superbolt production facility in Saint Gallenkappel, Switzerland. This allows Nord-Lock Group to effectively provide the world with Superbolt nut- and bolt-style tensioners, along with flex nuts, expansion bolts, and other state-of-the-art bolting technologies. If one of their standard or industry-specific solutions won’t work, Superbolt’s Performance Service team will engineer one that will. Extremely challenging applications in harsh environments have been solved with innovative and creative solutions. Whatever the industry, whatever the bolting challenge, Superbolt has an answer. See how they can help with your project. Visit their website at Nord dash Lock dot com (www.nord-lock.com). This is John Criswell for Manufacturing Marvels.

Viking Electronics Featured on Manufacturing Marvels® on FOX Business Network®


Hi, this is John Criswell.
Welcome to Manufacturing Marvels. The year was 1969 when man
first set foot on the moon; John Wayne showed “True Grit”
on the big screen; and Viking Electronics opened for business
in Hudson, Wisconsin. Viking Electronics is the source for American-made security and
communication products. They have dozens of product lines featuring over 500 items
for analog applications, as well as a rapidly growing
selection of IP-based solutions. Viking Electronics is an industry leader
in Emergency Phones, Entry Systems, Paging Interfaces, Mass Notification Systems, and much, much more. In fact, you can find those iconic
red hotline phones here. But it’s in developing new products
using the latest technologies where Viking really benefits its customers. With 50 years of experience,
the brand is known for simple designs, ease of use, and cost effectiveness, while refusing
to compromise on quality. Viking’s versatile product lines let customers upgrade and
enhance existing systems, even those from
competing manufacturers. Easy to integrate and built to last, Viking products are endorsed by major
key system and PABX manufacturers. Viking is porud to offer products
that are American-engineered, American-made, and American-supported. They’re backed by a two-year
limited warranty, and a world-class
technical support group, taking calls right at the
American Manufacturing facility. For product information
or to find a distributor near you, visit www.VikingElectronics.com. This is John Criswell for Manufacturing Marvels.

Toyota recruiting hundreds of US workers


LOOKING TO STAFRN A MID-WESTERN PLANT LIVE IN A INDIANA WITH DETAILS.>>GOOD MORNING IF YOU LIKE THAT NEW CAR SMELL NEVER GETS FRESHER THAN RIGHT HERE THIS IS QUITE LITERALLY THE END OF THE LINE THIS IS WHERE THE FINISHED PRODUCT COMES OFF-LINE AT THIS MASSIVE PLANT AND THAT MEANS IT IS DONE READY TO DRIVE OFF I BRING IN PRESIDENT OF TOYOTA IN INDIANA MILLY MARSHALL UNDER A PUSH TO GET WORKERS HERE IF YOU HAVE A PREPONDERANCE MINUTES MAKE PICK.>>GOOD MORNING, IT IS A PLEASURE TO HAVE YOU HERE IN SOUTHWEST INDIANA A 600-MILLION-DOLLAR EXPANSION WITH ADDITION 40,000 HI LANDERS TRYING TO HAVE 400 TEAM MEMBERS.>>OPENINGS IN INDIANA AS WELL AS OTHER PARTS SPECIFICALLY IN ALABAMA, YOU ARE NOT GOING TO BE ABLE TO FIND JUST QUALIFIED WORKERS IN INDIANA YOU NEED TO CONVINCE PEOPLE TO MOVE HERE.>>ABSOLUTELY WE’VE HAD, HISTORIC UNEMPLOYMENT AND THIS IS A LARGE MANUFACTURING STATE ONE OF THE BIGGEST THINGS THAT WE NEED TO — WE NEED TO KIND OF — DISMISS MANUFACTURING NOT LIKE 60S JOBS GRVR WORKED IT WAS DIRTY UNSAFE DARK. AS YOU CAN SEE, WE HAVE LATEST TECHNOLOGY VERY SAFE, AND OUR TEAM MEMBERS LOVE WORKING HERE.>>I WANT TO POINT OUT WE HAVE ANOTHER MAP OF ALL THE OTHER MANUFACTURING CAR MANUFACTURING COMPANIES IN INDIANA, THEY SEE ARE A MAJORITY JAPANESE AUTO MAISHTHS HIRING AMERICANS EXACTLY WHAT PRESIDENT ASKED FOR.>>ABSOLUTELY, WE WANT TO BUILD WHERE WE SELL, IMPORTANT NOT ONLY THE INVESTMENT HERE BUT WE HIRE PEOPLE WITHIN COMMUNITY WHERE WE BUILD AND SELL.>>– TOUGH TASK I THINK YOU ARE UP FOR IT THEY HAVE GOT 400 OPENINGS PRODUCING UP TO 40,000 NEW CARS IN THE COMING YEARS, SO A LOT OF WORK TO BE DONE HERE AND WE’RE GETTING BEHIND P SCENES LOOK ALL DAY TODAY DAGEN: TELL MILLIE I LOVE OUR ACCENT YOU CAN TELL HER FOR

​Kraft Heinz: Two companies become one


I bet that everybody can open their pantries at home, and find Kraft or Heinz products. Spanning from cheese, coffee, ketchup, mayonnaise, and so on. Kraft Heinz is the company that resulted from the merger of the two powerhouse Kraft Foods Group and Heinz, and now is a global company with presence across 140 countries. That’s what one of the major reason for the merge, to leverage the Heinz network for the expansion of Kraft worldwide. The focus from day one establishing the new culture for the company. Our technology helped us a lot, we have Office 365 in both companies. In the first day I could immediately connect with everybody in the company. That was mandatory for our integration, no business disruptions. We have everybody in the same address book, in the same email. It was very important for me to be able to communicate with my team on day one of the merger. Having Office 365 makes it that much easier for me to understand ideas that have been successful for other brands “that collaboration makes it easier for me to gather insights from other teams.” Essentially everything that I’m working on, from a campaign to a new product, it really allows me to incorporate real-time feedback from my colleagues as I’m looking at sales presentations. It allows me to collaborate with my team members in real-time, and by doing so we’re able to move a lot more quickly. It’s important to respond dynamically to the market needs. Cloud is one of the key element that will give us that kind of agility, making sure that we have cognitive systems that allow us to predict, allow us to self-learn, and to mimic behaviors. We are a company of analytical people, everything we do is driven by data. Power BI will allow us to provide analytical data to people with the flexibility they need without any constraint on the performance. When you look at Office 365, I see some areas of innovation that resonate very well at Kraft Heinz. With Skype for Business with PSTN and Cloud PBX, we’ll connect some more people, and get even faster decision making wherever they are. The importance of teamwork and collaboration, it’s the base of how our company operates. In an organization that is global, Office 365 is the engine helping us to be one single company, one single organization, have the people working together.

How The Ford Model T Took Over The World


This Episode of Real Engineering is brought
to you by Skillshare, home to over 20,000 classes that could teach you a new lift skill. The Ford Model T was not the first car. Not even close. Depending on how you define what a car is,
that honour was achieved 100 years before Henry Ford was even born in 1769, when French
engineer Nicolas-Joseph Cugnot created this steam powered vehicle designed to travel off
rail. The honour for the first true automobile goes
to Karl Benz, founder of Mercedes Benz, in 1885. With this single piston 2 stroke gasoline
powered vehicle. The art of the automobile was well under development
before Henry Ford hit the scene. No Ford did not invent the automobile, he
invented something much more profound. He created modern society. That is a massive claim, but bear with me. His manufacturing techniques did not just
revolutionise how we design and build everything. Making complicated machinery like tractors
and cars affordable for the masses. His manufacturing techniques radically changed
the trajectories of billions of people’s careers. At the turn of the 18th century craft manufacturing
was the status quo. Defined by a highly skilled workforce. People wishing to pursue a career in automotive
manufacturing, entered their career and progressed through an apprenticeship. Picking up a huge variety of skills, gradually
learning the tricks of the trade and being masters of their craft. Many would go on to run their own machine
shops. These were less employees, and more contractors. In these days, a machine like an automobile
was not built entirely in house. Parts would come from smaller machine shops
from all over a city. They used general purpose tools and machines
to create the parts needed, which would be sent to the final assembler. These part would vary massively from one batch
to another, requiring a skill assembling team. Workers needed to understand the function
of the part they were working on, and skillfully manipulate the parts together into the final
vehicle. There was no mass manufacturing of complex
machines like this. Each vehicle was one of a kind, commissioned
by whoever was wealthy enough to afford it. At this production volume no company could
create a monopoly. There were hundreds of small craft shops like
this across Western Europe and North America, but many would soon be run out of business
by Henry Ford before they had the chance to adopt his mass manufacturing techniques. Only the best craft manufacturers survived. Companies like Aston Martin and Bentley succeeded
by focusing on the ultra wealthy that could afford these one off vehicles, using skilled
craftsmen to build unique and luxurious cars, but even they would soon have to join the
movement to survive. All eventually being bought out by these mass
production power houses, no longer able to keep up with cost of innovation and manufacturing
required to keep pace in the automotive industry. At the high point of the Model T’s success
in 1923, Ford was manufacturing 2.1 million Model Ts a year, a figure that would only
be matched by a single vehicle model again with the VW Beetle. Many people chalk Henry Ford’s success down
to inflexibility in design. The famous quote of “You can have colour
as long as it is black”. This was true for many years, but perhaps
not for the reason you think. You see, Henry Ford was obsessed with manufacturing
speeds. The painting process he used allowed the paint
to dry quickly, and it was only available in black. [6] He shaved time off wherever possible to
achieve that monumental milestone of 2.1 million Model Ts a year. The Model-T was no fluke, it was the culmination
in over 20 design iterations over 5 years. Each one tweaking the design and manufacturing
procedure to cut seconds off the total process, and the innovations continued through the
nearly 20 years of production, that would see a total of 15 million Model Ts manufactured. On the first day of production in 1908, the
average task cycle for the Model T lasted 514 minutes. The task cycle time is the length of time
before a single task is repeated. So, the average worker did not repeat a task
for 8 and a half hours. For Ford, this was essentially how quickly
a single production line was producing vehicles, as assembly lines cannot start a new vehicle
until another has exited at the other end. So, he set to work on reducing that cycle
time, and by 1913 he managed to bring it down to just 2.3 minutes. For a product this complex, consisting of
hundreds of parts, with hundreds of processes, that is astounding and was something no other
company had ever achieved. How on earth did Ford achieve this quantum
leap forward in manufacturing speedl? Let’s first start with innovations that
Ford was not responsible for that allowed him to begin this journey. As I said, one of the reasons highly skilled
workers were essential to these industries before Ford came along, was because of the
high variability between parts. In engineering we call this tolerancing. When I worked as a design engineer, I needed
to specify the tolerances I needed for specific part features. Say I needed a shaft to fit a particular hole,
I need to specify how much the machinist was permitted to deviate from the listed dimension. If I have a 20 mm hole paired with a 19 mm
shaft, and I specify that both can deviate from that dimension by plus or minus 0.5 millimeters. Even at the extreme ends of both, where both
are 19.5 mm wide, they will still fit with some force. This may not be acceptable depending on application,
and higher tolerancing may be needed, which generally means an increase in cost. Engineers regularly screw up with these things
even today, but in Ford’s day consistently achieving a tolerance that tight in mass manufacturing
would have been huge task, and was generally something saved for military applications,
and not for low cost consumer products. This was largely due to the manufacturing
techniques of the day, specifically heat treatment methods. As explained in my knife forging and aluminium
videos, metals need to be heated and cooled in specific ways to strengthen or harden the
metal, but this also makes the metal much harder to cut and shape, so the metals were
often cut first and heat treated after. This heating and cooling causes the metal
to deform due to thermal expansion, which can then throw the original piece out of tolerance. This is called warping, and it made it nigh
on impossible to get a consistent final product. Many attribute Ford with revolutionizing the
standardisation of parts [3], but in truth he was simply at the right place at the right
time to benefit from technologies that facilitated it. New methods for cutting and stamping pre-hardened
metals allowed Ford to eliminate much of this variability due to warping. Advancements in precision measurement and
manufacturing allowed Ford to be confident that parts would be interchangeable, and in
turn this allowed Ford to design his vehicles in a way that reduced costs. This was the dawn of destruction for the craft
manufacturing industry, and the beginning of a movement that would change the face of
modern society. While his competitors were casting each cylinder
of their engine blocks separately and bolting them together, due to the difficulty in casting
a single part with multiple holes that needed to line up precisely. Ford casted a single complex engine block,
that drastically reduced the time required to manufacture and assembly it. This of course, led to incredibly expensive
dedicated machinery needed to manufacture a single piece of the vehicle. In the world of craft manufacturing, a skilled
worker could use a general purpose tool and skillfully use it to produce the final product. In the world of mass manufacturing this was
not acceptable. It took too long and required skilled workers
who were too difficult to replace. For example, engine blocks consist of an upper
and lower part that need to mate perfectly to maintain a seal for engine compression. Ford’s competitors, like Cadillac, used
a single flexible milling machine to create a flush surface on both the upper and lower
halves of the engine block. Engine blocks and heads were loaded and milled
slowly and precisely one at a time. Ford instead created dedicated machines to
mill engine blocks and engine heads separately, 15 and 30 at a time respectively. Workers simply snapped the unmilled pieces
into a tray while the previous lot was being milled, and then pushed the tray into place
when the time came. A worker could be trained in 5 minutes to
do this task. They didn’t need to speak the same language
as the person next to them. They didn’t need to think about anything
else. Just feed the machine. Like the little butter passing robot of Rick
and Morty, “What is my purpose? You pass butter. OH MY GOD.”
these people had a single purpose. This of course resulted in inflexibility in
design. The cost of introducing an entirely new model
vehicle was drastically increased. This is why, even today, that car brands tend
to iterate on old designs rather than introduce entirely new models. It’s simply too expensive and time consuming
to retrofit entire production lines. When Ford eventually decided to completely
redesign the Model T and produce the Model A, these machines were thrown out, but he
had achieved his goal, cycle times were lowering, and there was still room to improve. Ford managed to half cycle times from 2.3
minutes to 1.2 minutes, with his next innovation. When production first started on the Model
T employees worked from a stationary work stand. If they needed a part or tool they would get
up and get it themselves. Ford soon recognized the waste and introduced
dedicated stock suppliers, who’s only job was to ensure that other workers had the parts
they needed to keep production running at a constant pace. Where possible these employees were replaced
with automated supply lines. This idea grew and evolved to the introduction
of Ford’s greatest manufacturing innovation, the moving assembly line, a manufacturing
technique still in use today, even for huge machines like planes. This is Boeing’s moving assembly like for
the 777, which carries the entire 166 tonne plane across the factory ford, gradually adding
the 3 million parts needed to complete it. This method introduces a sense of urgency
to the factory floor, an ever looming deadline to complete your work before the plane reaches
the next production step. If there is a critical problem the entire
production line will literally stop moving until it’s fixed. [5] Ford was not the first to introduce such
an idea. They had been used in simple production lines
for butchering of carcasses and food preparation before, but never for anything this complex
and Ford applied it as a science. Using his engineering skills to help pioneer
a new branch of engineering, industrial engineering. A branch of engineering mostly concerned with
optimizing the logistics of manufacturing. Spend a few hours playing Factorio and you
will really gain an appreciation for the complexity of this profession. It starts off simple, but as your factory
grows you need to carefully manage production speeds to avoid pile ups. You need to plan and place your production
units to maximize transportation speeds, and get the products where they need to be. One of the huge problems you run into is faster
production units producing items faster than you need them further up the line, causing
pile ups of stock that can back up and actually block other production units, before you know
it production has grinder to a halt. The moving assembly line forces all workers
to work at the same pace. Faster workers can’t produce items faster
than they are needed, and slower workers can’t slack off. Ford’s innovations catapulted The Ford Motor
Company to international success, but that dominance would not last forever. Companies came from all over the world to
observe Ford’s factories. They marveled at how the factory itself was
like a finely tuned machine, each part feeding into the other. They took their lessons home, and by 1955
mass manufacturing had proliferated around the world, and soon companies outside the
US were not just catching up with the big three of Detroit. Ford, General Motors and Cadillac, but far
exceeding their capabilities. Most notably Toyota in post world war 2 Japan
who led a revolution in manufacturing through a new manufacturing philosophy, lean manufacturing. This graph shows all vehicles produced by
region after 1955, showing the explosion in growth in Japan with the advent of lean manufacturing,
that would lead to Detroit’s eventually demise. Detroit would soon become a ghost town. Just as these companies viewed their machines
as disposable, they viewed their employees as disposable. Dropping them the moment demand tanked. This problem has only got worse. Zero hour contracts and strict control of
unions is common. Ford actually paid his workers incredibly
well for the time, but that meant little when demand dropped and these workers had few transferable
skills to gain new employment. For better or worse Ford’s innovations completely
changed the job market for billions of people. I was one of those people, working 12 hour
shifts with only one task. Weigh a stent and pass it to the next step. During that time I made extra efforts to learn
new skills outside of work to keep myself sane. One way to learn new skills is through Skillshare,
and why not start by learning about the stock market with this course from my friends at
Business Casual, who I have also just made a video about Henry Ford’s rise to success
on their channel. This is just one in over 20,000 classes you
could take on Skillshare. That range from creative skills like painting
and music lessons to technical skills like coding. With professional and understandable classes,
that follow a clear learning curve, you can dive in and start learning how to do the work
you love. .
A Premium Membership begins around $10 a month for unlimited access to all courses, but the
first 1000 people to sign up with this link will get their first 2 months for free. So ask yourself right now. What skill have you been putting off learning. What project have you been dreaming of completing,
but you aren’t sure if you have the skills to do it. Why not start right now and sign up to Skillshare
using the link below to get your first 2 months free. You have nothing to lose and a valuable life
skill to gain. As usual thanks for watching and thank you
to all my Patreon supporters. If you would like to see more from me, the
links to my twitter, facebook, discord server, subreddit and instagram pages are below.

Fusion OEM Fox Business News 2


Manufacturing jobs taking a big hit in September, the sector lost 13,000 jobs so maybe the problem isn’t the lack of actual jobs, perhaps maybe a lack of skilled workers. Jeff Fox is at a company in Burr Ridge, Illinois that just can’t seem to find the right kind of workers. Jeff, what are they looking for? They’re looking for people with skills Lori and this is happening all over the country, this is Fusion OEM, we’re in Burr Ridge, Illinois and I’ll tell ya Craig Zoberis runs this company. Take a look at the inside, hey Tim go ahead and poke your camera in there. What am I looking at? I’m looking at a piece of something being machined and you need skilled people to run these machines. Yeah, that’s correct. We’re looking for skilled people that can operate these equipments. We’re basically at a standstill, we want to build on this manufacturing company but I can’t find enough skilled people to build on these manufacturing machines. Lori, look at this machine. Could you step back for just one second? I want to look at how complex this is, this is a skilled worker, this is not just somebody off the street that can run this and you literally are having problems finding people. Right, the best thing we can do right now is find some people with some technical experience in the manufacturing world and then we train them up. Great example is right here, we got Brian over here who is training Miguel over here on using these equipments. He’s a very seasoned guy, a fresh guy here at Fusion. With all the unemployment out there let’s put the numbers up as Lori as you reported 13,000 manufacturing jobs lost last month. There’s now a total of 11.74 million manufacturing workers in the U.S., that is down 40% from the peak of manufacturing jobs in this country which was the back of 1979, that was about 19 million. And these guys that are assembling, and what are they assembling here Craig? They’re assembling packaging equipment for the protective packaging industry. These are highly teched people too, they get good experience in the technical colleges and then they apply it here. We heard from one manufacturing company that said they get a thousand applications, maybe 25 of the applications are from people that have the skills they need. I believe it, it’s really difficult. Not only to do with skills, sometimes we pass on people that have huge egos. We’re looking for good people that we want to work with along with the technical capability. And Lori I’m gonna leave you with one more picture and that’s a graphic that we have that sorta kinda shows you how manufacturing jobs have changed in this country. You know it used to be small management at the top, a few skilled workers and then most of them were unskilled workers. Well now it’s more like a diamond, the majority are skilled workers that you need and by the way we leave you with this picture which is also one of the the the pieces of equipment. This is what they make, you know the stuff that they stuff Lori packages with, with these inflated sort of things? This is the machine that makes that, they make the machine and that’s not dummies work. No, these are very smart people and there is a high demand for them. Gotcha. There you go Lori, interesting, a lot a lot a unemployment out there but there’s also a lot of jobs just not the right people for them. Yeah the show and tells fascinating. That is some complicated stuff Jeff indeed.

20 Best Small Business Ideas in India to Start Business for 2016-17


20 small business ideas in india for
2017 if you’re interested to start a small manufacturing business then you
can start any of these 20 small businesses in 2016 and 2017 one aluminum
fabrication as an example installing aluminum windows doors frames among
households government offices corporate offices shops etc to furniture business
you can manufacture office furniture versatile furniture luxury furniture any
and many creative design furnitures three paper cup business you can sell
paper cups at local tea stalls wholesalers parties marriage parties
hotels restaurants etc and make your income for paper plate business paper
plates are widely used in marriage parties hotels events etc so you can
start this business in India five bag manufacturing business you can start a
bag manufacturing business such as school bags handbags fashion bags
traveling bags tool bags etc 6 marble manufacturing business in today’s new
generation small marble manufacturing business is a great opportunity to start
a new small business in india seven hollow cement blocks manufacturing
business is a best and trendy business idea in India people will love to
install them in their houses boundary walls shops malls etc aight cement tile manufacturing business
has simple manufacturing procedures and ever-growing demand in various markets
such as local and consumers local tile manufacturers etc nine paper and
notebooks this is a great business idea to sell
your paper and notebooks to schools colleges offices etc 10 fertilizer or
chemical production business you can start this business with small
fertilizer production like food preservation chemicals cleaning and
washing chemicals like fennel asset or kitchen and glass cleaning liquid 11
leather belt manufacturing this is a nice option to start your small business
with small capital and high market demand 12 not bolts manufacturing this
is another compelling market opportunity where you can start this small business
and earn a good income even in the beginning stage 13 hand tools
manufacturing you can make some hand tools like screwdrivers shaping tools
scissors hunter chisels hammers etc and sell it to the entire world 14 yogurt
production business is a good small business even you can easily find many
customers who consume yogurt and many products and process 15 vegetable
processing unit if you have an idea for some investment then you can buy a
drying machine and convert fresh vegetables into dried form then package
it and sell to export markets at high margins 16 flower production business install a
flower production unit in your locality and start a flower production business
17 potato chips production is also a good business for small business owners
18 jute bags manufacturing business is the best option for aspiring
entrepreneurs to consider manufacturing and selling eco-friendly jute bags 19
diaper manufacturing business is in the hot trend due to high demand in this
modern generation and twenty paper towel manufacturing business is a very good
idea and compelling opportunity for inspiring people to start a small
business in India. ok

Pay It Forward: Military to Manufacturing



all across the United States to be truthful manufacturers all across this nation are looking for a workforce about 400,000 unfilled jobs in manufacturing today and we forecast there's about 2 million that will go unfilled between now and 2025 and veterans would be a key way to help fill that gap so I seven days after I graduated I went into the army I was stationed at Fort Bragg North Carolina for three years it was an airborne military police unit when I got out there was a smelter in the area had opened up a production opportunity and so I started working in 1990 working and the pot lines on night shift as a pot line operator helped her well I think manufacturing is a good home for veterans pretty much constantly in the military you're being put in scenarios or situations in which you know you're having to be able to problem-solve and to be able to work through things and then and then to actually make a decision so getting into manufacture I do that every day one thing too that I appreciate about our Connick is like the the support that they give you know we've gotta names these employee resource group meetings that we have with the veterans and it's nice because we can have these conversations you know how do we help other veterans and whether it's the homeless veterans or the VA or for people they still do have some issues is you know they they're so supportive of getting help when you need it and so I just know that's making me emotional so today we're having our first military to manufacturing forum at Washburn Institute of Technology together with our partners at the Kansas Chamber of Commerce and our connick to bring together the military community the business community and the educational community to talk about how we build better pathways for former military members into manufacturing careers they've transitioned from one career to another and throughout the military so this agility allows them to to perform in many ways in many capacities for manufacturing I think with my story I really didn't realize like the the skills and experiences and the lessons that I can't of military with I did not realize that that meant anything we served our country we had a purpose now we're looking for another venture and that net another purpose is going to be avoiding a manufacturer they're trying to bring it back to America what better way to have the computer that served America being trained to serve America again bring these companies back 27 years later and I'm like oh my gosh that is really why I am where I am today it's important to share your story with other veterans because especially what the ones that are just getting out and don't realize the impact that they can have or they can make on manufacturing you