Teaching Talking Safety: Lesson 4—Emergencies at Work


[ Music ]>>Welcome back to Talking Safety,
Lesson 4, Emergencies at Work. In this lesson, we’ll define the term emergency, inform students
about the types of emergencies that can occur on the job and help students learn strategies for responding to
emergencies at work through a board game, Disaster Blaster. For this lesson, you’ll need a computer and projector
with PowerPoint presentation slides 41 through 43, the Disaster Blaster game board, which are student handouts
10 and 11, a pair of scissors to cut the game cards, 1 die and 2 game pieces for each group of 4 students,
and prizes such as candy, pencils, or stickers. Class, any anyone define the term job emergency?>>Something bad that happens unexpectedly?>>Almost. An emergency is any unplanned event that poses a threat. An emergency could threaten employees, customers, or the public. It might shut down work at a business,
cause damage, or harm the environment.>>So, a tornado would be an emergency, right?>>Yes. What are some other examples of
emergencies that could happen at work?>>Violence.>>A chemical spill.>>Very good. Those are all emergencies. The best way to deal with an emergency is to be prepared.>>Wait. How do you prepare for something
when you don’t know what’s going to happen?>>With practice. Just like we have fire drills here at school. We’ve planned ahead and thought of the steps to
take in the event that there is an emergency. Similar to school, when you start a new job, your employer
should let you know about the kinds of emergencies that can happen and what should be done to remain safe. Since there are many different types of emergencies
that could happen, we are going to play a board game that will help you learn what to do in certain emergencies. I want you to partner up with another classmate,
then pick another team to play against. To begin, one team will role the die
and move the number of spaces shown. They should follow the instructions written on
the spaces for moving around the game board. Whenever a team’s game piece lands on a square with a
question mark, the opposing team picks a Disaster Blaster card from the top of the deck and reads
the question to the other team.>>What phone number should you call to report an emergency?>>911.>>No fair. That was easy.>>Gosh.>>Since they answered correctly, they roll again. Each team’s turn ends after two questions
even if they answer correctly. If the answer is incorrect, the answering team’s game
piece remains on the square until their next turn. To win, a team must roll the exact number
of spaces needed to land on the home space. And the team must also answer a question correctly.>>Name at least two things that
should be in an emergency action plan?>>The name of the person in charge. Oh, and escape routes.>>Yeah. It says name of the person who is in charge, escape
routes, training, drills, alarm systems, and meeting place. So, yeah you got that right.>>[Background Music] This concludes lesson four
of six in the Talking Safety Training Video Series. In this lesson, we defined the term emergency, informed students
about the types of emergencies that can occur on the job, and help students learn strategies for responding to
emergencies at work through a board game, Disaster Blaster. We hope you found this training informative. Thanks for watching. You can get more information on young workers’
safety and health topics from any of these resources. [ Music ]

Delivering Drinking Water Is Serious Business


It’s a service footprint nearly as vast as California itself from Lake County at the edge of the Mendocino National Forest south to Calipatria at just 33 miles north of the Mexican border. Golden State Water Company provides high-quality drinking water in compliance with Drinking Water Standards to more than 80 communities throughout the Golden State. It’s an enormous responsibility. Golden State Water delivers, not just high-quality water but peace-of-mind as well for the roughly 1 million Californians who depend on that service. “Water is the only utility where our customers consume what we produce, and so it’s not just that we’re providing a service, but we actually can have an impact on public health. Dawn White is a key member of Golden State’s water quality team — engineers, scientists and water experts who collectively focus on water safety. They oversee compliance with water quality standards throughout the treatment process and delivery of water to homes and businesses with a thorough monitoring and testing program designed to assess the safety of water from beginning to end of a distribution process. To do that Golden State’s water quality team checks for hundreds of contaminants some of which are naturally occurring and common in the state’s groundwater basins, and others that come from environmental pollution that could pose a threat to the water supply. Each year Golden State Water invests roughly half a million dollars to have samples analyzed by certified independent laboratories to ensure all state and federal quality standards are being met. “So we use certified independent labs that are approved by the state of California Division of Drinking Water that make sure that the labs are qualified to run the samples. We make sure that the quality of the data that they submit to the state and submit to us is of the high, high-quality. California standards are stringent enforced by the state’s Division of Drinking Water and the Environmental Protection Agency. The California Public Utilities Commission provides an extra layer of oversight and protection for regulated water providers like Golden State. California’s Division of Drinking Water is comprised of scientists and water quality experts that establish safety standards, or Maximum Contaminant Levels, at levels to protect public health for all ages and genders. Data from throughout the state is reported directly from independent labs to the Division of Drinking Water to confirm compliance with quality standards and then posted online to provide transparency for consumers. Customers were also issued Consumer Confidence Reports that detail water sources and water quality information — a report card of sorts that holds water providers to the highest standards. They really do it as a public health protection process. They recognized from past health issues… public health and disease outbreaks many years ago…that a safe and sound water system is a key public health component.” Golden State Water is committed to the delivery of safe and clean water whether for drinking, bathing cleaning or irrigation…at home, at work or in local schools. “Our water quality department really cares about providing safe drinking water We all drink the water that we deliver and we want our customers to know that we care and make sure that the water they get is safe to drink every day

Day at Work: GIS Analyst


My name is Wesley Catanzaro and I am a cartographer
and GIS analyst in the field of public health. GIS is software that allows you to represent
real world phenomenon mainly through maps. I’ve always liked maps. I think they are pretty cool. And I think they are cooler now that I know how to make them. Um, and I think they’re pretty awesome tools for just you know relating the world around us and processing information and communicating it in a really effective way. You don’t have to be a doctor or a nurse
to get into public health. You know, there are different subsets of public health like environmental health, which takes very interdisciplinary approach and requires a pretty broad understanding of how things relate geographically and spatially. Well, uh, a typical day for me might include
going out into the field and doing some field work. Surveying the streets for pedestrian
environmental quality. Determining whether or not these things can be improved upon. For instance, we’ll look at how many crosswalks there are at an intersection. How long a pedestrian is given to cross at a particular intersection. We’ll look for additional signs
at intersections or along the streets which relate to pedestrians’ safety. Whether two people can walk side by side on a street – are there sidewalk obstructions things like abandon buildings and graffiti and excess litter, keep people from using sidewalks. When you’re talking about public health especially you know you want to get people out and about walking and
encouraging them to get out of their automobiles. So after I conduct a survey and I fill out
the forms, I take that information back to the office and I’ll uh input it into the computer
using standard programs like Microsoft Access and then that information is imported into
ArcGIS the main spatial analysis software that GIS analysts use usually. That information then can be mapped, you know, in a very easy to understand uh fashion by scoring the streets according to the data that we picked out from the field. The mapped area is really what you want the user to spend their time looking at. And you know, the text should inform but it shouldn’t dominate. Somebody can easily look at this map and they can see what needs to be changed, and what streets are ranking pretty high in pedestrian quality, and which streets don’t rank as high and then that information can be relayed to you know, the department of public works or you know, anyone else who’s making decisions in regarding pedestrian infrastructure. You wanna really focus while you’re in high school on, you know, those basic math courses and science courses to learn how to write well in a scientific way. If your school offers geography as an elective, you should take that because you can really start gaining an understanding for that… relationship that spatial relationship between things and how things effect each other in space. I do wish that I had learned how to uh, program, when I was in high school. um… Because a lot of GIS analysts use computer programming to more effectively do their work. For a long time I haven’t really felt that I had much of an artistic bone in my body. But, I think that I’ve been able to kind of express that um… through maps. I think that it is something that I’m pretty good at and uh, I’ve liked what I have done so far with them. You can really make beautiful looking maps that are pleasant to look at as well as being effective in communicating something about the real world.

ECDC at work – who we are, what we do


The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). ECDC is a European Union agency for public health.
It fights infectious diseases and prevents outbreaks. It is located in Stockholm, Sweden
and employs almost 300 staff. The Centre collects and shares data
on more than 50 infectious diseases such as influenza, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis and measles. ECDC pools knowledge and promotes best practices among public health professionals. ECDC helps countries respond to outbreaks
and public health threats. Threats from microorganisms such as viruses or bacteria
concern us all. At ECDC, we collect data 24 hours, 7 days a week from all over the world assess the risks for Europe and then share this information with European countries and international organisations. ECDC’s ambition is to keep over 500 million people
safe from infectious diseases. That’s what we do.

Eight vaping companies face lawsuits from North Carolina’s AG


TO OUR TOP STORY THIS HALF HOUR, THE FOCUS ON E-CIGARETTES AN VAPING, NEXT GUEST IS SUING 8 COMPANIES SAY THEY AGGRESSIVE TARGET CHILDREN AND DO NOT ENFORCE AGE RESTRICTIONS AND NEW UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS STUDY SHOW THAT IS TEEN WHO IS ARE EXPOSED TO VAPING AND E-CIGARETTES ARE MORE LIKELY TO PURCHASE THE PRODUCT. 20.8% OF HIGH SCHOOLERS AND 4.9% OF MIDDLE SCHOOLERS REPORTEDLY VAPE, UNREGULATED TO ADVERTISING COULD BE A FACTOR, JOINING US NOW NORTH CAROLINA ATTORNEY GENERAL JOHN STEIN, JOSH ATTORNEY GENERAL, GOOD TO SEE YOU.>>THANK YOU FOR HAVING ME ON. DAGEN: WHAT IS THE STATE DOING TO STOP THIS?>>THERE’S AN EPIDEMIC OF VAPING AMONG HIGH SCHOOLERS AND MIDDLE SCHOOLERS AND NOT ONLY IN NORTH CAROLINA, IT’S ACROSS THE COUNTRY. IN ONE YEAR FROM 2017 TO 2018 WE SAW LIKE AN 80% INCREASE IN REPORTED USE JUST IN ONE YEAR, SO WE DON’T EVEN KNOW WHAT THE 2019 NUMBERS ARE GOING TO SHOW. IT AFFECTS THE CHILDREN’S LUNGS, THE HEART, LEADS TO ADDICTION TO NICOTINE THAT CAN CAUSE LIVES TO SPIRAL, LUKA IN EFFORTS TO BE COOL IN NINTH GRADE HE BECAME ADDICTED TO JEWEL AND LIFE SPIRALED OUT OF CONTROL AND GRADES TUMBLED, HE LOST, HE DROPPED OFF CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM, BOY SCOTS, — BOY SCOUTS AND CONSEQUENCES ARE MAJOR AND I WILL DO EVERYTHING IN MY POWER AS ATTORNEY GENERAL TO PROTECT YOUNG PEOPLE FROM BECOMING ADDICTED TO THE VERY DANGEROUS PRODUCTS. DAGEN: YOU FILED SUIT AGAINST 8 DIFFERENT COMPANIES RELATED TO THIS, WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FOR AND JUST TELL US ABOUT THOSE LAWSUITS.>>SURE, I SUED JEWEL WHICH IS THE 800-POUND GORILLA OF THE INDUSTRY EARLIER THIS YEAR, THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE 75 OR 85% TEEN VAPING MARKET BUT ALL THE SMALLER PLAYERS THAT ARE ENGAGED IN WHAT I ALLEGE TO BE OUTRAGEOUS BEHAVIOR, THEY USE FLAVORS LIKE COTTON CANDY, GUMMY BEAR, FRENCH TOAST, UNICORN, FLAVORS THAT ARE KNOWN TO APPEAL TO CHILDREN, THEY DESIGN THE PRODUCTS IN A WAY TO APPEAL TO KIDS BY MAKING THEM LOOK LIKE USB PORTS AND MARKET IN SOCIAL NETWORKING CHANNELS LIKE SNAPCHAT THAT TEENS USE AND USE PICTURE OF ONE OF THEIR PRODUCTS AND, NO, MOM IT’S A USB PORT, THAT COULD BE DIRECT TODAY A YOUNG PERSON AND NOT TO YOU OR ME. FINALLY THEY ARE EITHER HOLY FAILING TO DO ANY VERIFICATION WHICH VIOLATES CAROLINA LAW. I’VE GONE TO COURT BECAUSE I WANT THE COURTS TO SHUT PRACTICES DOWN SO WE DO NOT LOSE ANOTHER GENERATION OF TEENAGERS TO NICOTINE ADDICTION. DAGEN: WHAT ABOUT GOING AFTER THE STORES THAT SELL THESE PRODUCTS TO TEENS, AGAIN, REST STOPS, YOU KNOW THROUGHOUT NORTH CAROLINA, I CAN OF OF — KIOKS,I CAROLINA, I CAN OF OF — KIOKS,’ CAROLINA, I CAN OF OF — KIOKS,S ABOUT MORE THAN TARGETING COMPANIES THAT MAKE E-VAPING PRODUCTS.>>I AGREE WITH YOU, WE NEED A MULTIFACET APPROACH. THEY ARE THE ONES WHO ARE ADVERTISING TO YOUNG PEOPLE TO INDUCE THEM TO USE AND ULTIMATELY BECOME ADDICTED TO THEIR PRODUCTS WHICH I FIND TO BE UNCONSCIONABLE BUT UNLAWFUL HERE IN NORTH CAROLINA AND I WANT TO SHUT THEM DOWN. DAGEN: I WANT TO TURN TO OPIOID PRICES, PERDUE PHARMA, MAKER OF OXYCODONE ARE REPORTEDLY OFFERING TO SETTLE LAWSUITS $12 BILLION, ACCUSED OF BEING PARTIALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE OPIOID CRISIS, ATTORNEY GENERAL IN NORTH CAROLINA FILED SUIT IN MAY 2018, WHAT IS THE ROLE IN CAROLINA?>>I CANNOT COMMENT ON DISCUSSIONS BUT WHAT I CAN TELL YOU THAT PERDUE PHARMA IS RESPONSIBLE FOR OPIOID EPIDEMIC, WE LOSE ABOUT 5 NORTH CAROLINIANS EVERY DAY TO OPIOID OVERDOES, IT IS DEVASTATING, INDIVIDUALS, FAMILIES, COMMUNITIES, AND I BELIEVE THAT THE DRUG MANUFACTURERS AND THE DRUG DISTRIBUTORS WHO ALL PLAY A ROLE OF FUELING THIS EPIDEMIC MUST PLAY A ROLE IN ADDRESSING IT. DAGEN: WHAT ADDITIONAL STEPS COULD YOU AS ATTORNEY GENERAL IN NORTH CAROLINA TAKE ON THIS, WE COVERED YESTERDAY HEAVILY THE HALF A BILLION DOLLAR FINE AGAINST JOHNSON & JOHNSON OUT OF OKLAHOMA WHICH CAME IN GREAT DEAL LOWER THAN MANY PEOPLE WERE EXPECTING?>>WELL, I HAVE GONE TO COURT. I’VE SUED PERDUE PHARMA, SO LITIGATION IS AN IMPORTANT ROLE THAT THE ATTORNEY GENERAL PLAYS BUT I AM TRYING TO TAKE A VERY BROAD NOTION OF WHAT I CAN DO TO FIGHT THIS EPIDEMIC, SO WE ARE FIGHTING TO REDUCE THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO BECOME ADDICTED THROUGH PUBLIC EDUCATION, WE HAVE A WONDERFUL WEBSITE MOREPOWERFULNC.ORG. STOP ACT THAT REDUCES OVERPRESCRIBING BY DOCTORS, I’M ADVOCATING THAT WE HAVE MORE TREATMENT OPTIONS BY EXPANDING MEDICAID HERE IN NORTH CAROLINA AND, OF COURSE, WE ARE GOING TO GO AGGRESSIVELY AFTER DRUG DEALERS AND DUG TRAFFICKERS WHO ARE EXPLOITING PEOPLE’S ADDICTIONS TO MAKE MILLIONS OF DOLLARS. DAGEN: I WANT TO RAISE THIS ISSUE CAREFULLY, THOUGH, ATTORNEY GENERAL, AND THIS IS NOT WHAT YOU DO FOR A LIVING BUT LEFT OUT OF THESE CONVERSATIONS ABOUT VAPING AND E-CIGARETTES AND THE ABUSE OF OPIOIDS IS PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY, AND AT WHAT POINT RESPONSIBILITY OF PARENTS OF TEENAGERS TO MAKE SURE THEY ARE NOT BUYING OUT DEVICES AND ALSO WHEN PEOPLE GET ADDICTED THAT IT’S SOMEBODY ELSE’S RESPONSIBILITY BECAUSE ULTIMATELY IT HURTS WITH OPIOIDS THE VERY PEOPLE WHO NEED THESE DRUGS TO MANAGE CATASTROPHIC PAIN?>>WELL, FOR INSTANCE, IN THE STOP ACT THAT WE PASSED IN NORTH CAROLINA, SET LIMIT ON PRESCRIBING FOR ACUTE PAIN WHEN YOU BREAK YOUR ARM OR HAVE WISDOM TEETH TAKEN OUT, DOES NOT ADDRESS CHRONIC PAIN WHICH IS REAL AND MUST BE TREATED, SO THERE ARE WAYS TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN PEOPLE WITH CATASTROPHIC PAIN AND JUST FOLKS WHO HAVE A MINOR MEDICAL PROCEDURE, BUT, LOOK, TEENAGERS ARE TEENAGERS, I’M A PARENT OF 3 SO I UNDERSTAND AND YOU CANNOT EXPECT A PARENT TO KNOW EVERY 40-DOLLAR PURCHASE YOUR CHILD MAKES AT A CONVENIENT STORE, YOU JUST CAN’T AND PEOPLE THINK THEY CAN, THEY DON’T HAVE THE FIRST CLUE OF PARENTING. SO KIDS, THEIR BRAINS ARE NOT FULLY DEVELOPED, THE BRAIN DOESN’T STOP DEVELOPING UNTIL 25, THEY WILL NOT ALWAYS MAKE GOOD DECISIONS WHICH IS WHY WE AS PARENTS, WE AS A STATE SHOULD PROTECT THEM FROM CORPORATIONS THAT WANT TO EXPLOIT THAT IMMATURITY AND CREATE ADDICTION AND IT’S INEXCUSABLE AND I AS ATTORNEY GENERAL WILL DO EVERYTHING I CAN FROM STOPPING

UCSF's New Food Industry Documents Archive Part 2



we're gonna go ahead and get started with the next panel it's my pleasure to introduce back to the stage Chris Shaffer who will introduce our next speakers hi everyone so it's my pleasure to introduce to you Kim Han Ewan research scientist working in health promotion and disparities research here at UCSF doctor knew twin studies individual community and societal level influences underlying the patterning of modifiable risk factors including tobacco use poor diet and lack of access to health care and has been a great partner with us in developing the industry document archives and the food document archives today so with that thanks Chris I'm really excited to be here and Stan gave you a great overview of the tobacco archives and all the wonderful research that's come out of it and that's transformed to back what we know about tobacco industry and my colleague Kristin Kearns talked about what we learned what she learned from the sugar documents about the sugar industry and sotae so right now I'm going to talk about our food research in the food industry in the tobacco archives when you think about the tobacco archives you think about tobacco industry and all the practices particularly in marketing to vulnerable populations such as children and minorities and but a few researchers have used the tobacco archive to look at food issues most famously is Michael Moss in 2013 and his book salt sugar and fat he wrote about the what happened with General Foods and craft in in the late 1980s and journalists from the Chicago Tribune in 2008 wrote a great piece called craving the cookie in which they followed the meetings between Philip Morris cigarette scientists and crafts food scientists so to really appreciate some of the documents about it of food in the tobacco archives 14 million documents in the tobacco archives we key in the term soda and thirty-five thousand documents pop up so that's a lot and so we wanted to take a closer look at the tobacco archive with the broad research question of what was the relationship or what is the relationship between tobacco companies and sugar and beverage companies so 13 2008 16 we took a deep dive into the tobacco archives and so starting in the 1960s tobacco companies started to diversify into non tobacco industries in particular they were buying up food and beverage companies and it was a climate of basically rising concerns about public health of cigarettes on public health as well as increasing government regulation of cigarettes and so we uncover some reasons why they would be interested in food and beverage so this is a document from the tobacco archive of Philip Morris in 1978 annual report and discussing their acquisition of 7up which is their first beverage company and so it says essentially soft drinks like cigarettes and beer are reasonably priced relatively low costs consumer items that give pleasure to users who repeat their purchases often when the quality of the product satisfies their expectations so fast-forward to the late 1980s Philip Morris purchased a few more food and beverage companies and we're thinking of buying craft and and this is a document in the tobacco archive discussing why that might be a good reason and this is the Philip Morris's CEO Hamish Maxwell and he says people can quit smoking and drinking but not eating so there are a lot of information and documents about the food and beverage companies that tobacco companies purchase and all of the brands that that were owned by these companies during the time ownership and just some of that you may recognize and so we took a look closer look to see what happened actually after these companies were purchased by the tobacco companies and what we found was a systematic transfer of people knowledge information and technology from the tobacco companies to the sugar and beverage companies and in 1985 Philip Morris purchase General Foods which was at the time the biggest acquisition in corporate history and the subsequent years began a elimination of the top management and executives of General Foods starting with its CEO James Ferguson who had been CEO since 1973 and so this is a New York Times piece discussing or investigating the the corporate reorganization of General Foods the General Foods as part of the Philip Morris companies said that they would eliminate most of its corporate staff and in that and in during that process had replaced some of the top management including brand directors as well as marketing executives and this reorganization was complete in 1998 when they got rid of the number two guy Philip Smith and instead of and and basically the all the division heads were now reporting directly to Philip Morris one of the things that we also discovered was that the technology that was developed for cigarettes were were applied to these beverage companies and this is a document from 1962 from RJR biochemical research division and it's rgr was basically the first tobacco company that diversified into food and beverage and they were thinking about buying some beverage companies and the division had said that thought it was a good idea because it is easy to characterize r.j. Reynolds merely as a tobacco company in a broader and much less restriction sense however RJ RJ Reynolds is in the flavor business so we wanted to take a look at some of the brands that these tobacco companies purchased and I wanted to share a little bit today about one such brand which is Hawaiian Punch which was developed in the 1930s and in by the 1950s was marketed as a adult mixer so a adult cocktail mixer beverage r.j. Reynolds Purchase Hawaiian Punch in 1962 and we wanted to find out what happened to the product and what we found was a transformation of Hawaiian Punch from adult mixer to a kid's beverage and we surmised from all the market research that was done on the product that this has happened and so this is we found a lot of focus groups done on Hawaiian Punch between 1966 to 1969 and so this is a taste test that was done in 1969 on mothers and children and it was comparing two formulations of Hawaiian Punch one Amber Apple which as its named is more of an apple apple color juice and red apple which had artificial coloring of red coloring and was formulate to be sweeter I was comparing it to high sea apple which was the popular drink brand of time and study found that the children preferred hi-c Apple over amber apple and the housewives or mothers chose red over excuse me chose amber over red and the study recommended that they discontinue further development of the amber apple product and introduced red apple clearly catering to children's preferences so we followed the marketing of Hawaiian Punch and found that punchy was the center of all of the marketing campaigns of Hawaiian Punch between the 1960s and the 1980s and punchy was this cartoon character there's a reverent cartoon character kid with a Hawaiian striped Hawaiian shirt and his tagline was how would you like your Hawaiian Punch and he would punch Olaf the adult character and run away and he was featured in many of the promotional materials such as wristwatches and board games as well as book covers and he was spun off our rgr spun off Hawaiian Punch to another beverage to a budget beverage company but stated that punchy was the best salesman that the beverage ever had so in following many of these products we found that a lot of the marketing strategies to promote these products were were applied and really honed in the by cigarette companies to increase smoking and children so some some such as kid-friendly flavors the packaging of these products and giving away toys and games and premiums using fun colors and also the use of cartoon characters and so you may recognize this guy he's Joe Camel and he is the cartoon mascot of camel brand also owned by RG r & RG are eminently denied that he was used to as a ploy to get children to smoke but in 1997 in the Mangini versus r.j. Reynolds case the court ruled that indeed Joe Camel was used to entice children and the and the company was forced to not use Joe Camel in its marketing materials however punchy to this day is still news as the mascot of Hawaiian Punch so that's all I have for today and I open to questions [Applause] hi so do we have any questions we have people with microphones at several places in the auditorium they're about in the archives are there items on deceptive advertisement to children on Saturday morning cartoons this is under the auspices of the Federal Trade Commission many years ago they were investigating these deceptive practices and had modified some of the children's shows did these shows up in the archives there's a lot in there it's quite interesting to work in the archive so there are some of the FTC documents I'm it's a you know in terms of the process of the FT during that time they collect a lot of documents so it's in there are you talking about what they know the companies what how they market to children I think that this what I presented was some of the sort of a slice of what is in there you know there's a lot of proprietary information or from the companies but they're also extraneous documents so from you know government sort of rulings newspaper articles so there's a lot that you can sort of find out about any issue really I hope I answered your question the food industry documents about show in just a sec we do have about six volumes from the FTC's rulemaking the public comments from the 70s for that children's advertising issue so there are about six volumes in in during your talk I was thinking about the marijuana industry in the rapid growth and I'm of course in San Francisco there's popular support for legalization but I've been really struck by the marketing to children you know the gummies and the worms and the flavours and I'm wondering with all the expertise in this room are people actively working on that topic are we so that we're not discovering the marijuana archives in retrospect you know at our next content absolutely I think this is very its uncovering a lot of parallels in all kinds of these products to children and I'm sure stan has a lot to say about that yeah in fact we published a paper called waiting for the opportune moment about how in the 60s and the 70s the tobacco companies were getting ready to go into the cannabis business as soon as it was legal so yeah of course anyone who has following up on what Cruz said anyone who has any internal documents related to that we're happy to take them I don't think that the cannabis industry is yet as well developed and corporatized as you have with food and and tobacco but I think that's coming and I think it's very scary yeah there's some research on flavored tobacco products like vape and things like that and we're very interested in that following that line of research and its application to flavors and colors in sugary beverages to children and so I think that there's a lot of opportunities for collaboration and an overlap hand up in the middle in the back I was going to elaborate on the tobacco industry moving into the cannabis space the alcohol industry is moving into the cannabis space very aggressively so if that's an area you want to get to get involved that's that those are who those are some of the people you might want to look at one more question I see a hand up here actually I think one of the common themes between sugar cannabis and tobacco may be addictiveness and we're seeing in the cannabis industry vast increases in potency that really parallel what happened with manipulation of nicotine mm-hmm I'd be thrilled and delighted if anyone wants to help find documentation of what's going on there but one of my questions for you is on the sugar side did you see any expressed discussion in the documents and in the archives on the issue of addictiveness and whether manipulation of sugar content creator habit-forming yeah all right caffeine we're very interested in in those issues and yes there are I mean through from the very beginning they're very interested and how to get people to drink more of these beverages particularly children and so we have been pursuing the issue of caffeine the addition of caffeine into these beverages which I know is a big issue in these energy drinks so I think I think overall it's just there's a lot there and we've been you know pulling these threads and it's been fascinating so hopefully you all think it is as well thank you very much so our next speaker is Rachel Takeda rachel is a document specialist at the UCSF library and rachel has been working with the industry documents library for many years and has been working with the the food industry documents archive since its inception rachel teaches classes in how to use the archives and is going to walk us through a demonstration of how to use the archives in just a moment but she also does work to promote the archives promote the use of them does a lot of the processing of the documents and is the person who many of you would reach if you reached out to the archives for assistance or had any questions about how to access it so with that I'll turn it over to Rachel all right so I'm Rachel Takeda and I help run the UCSF industry documents library of which the food industry documents is apart and I just have to say events like this just make my job so worth it I love hearing about the research coming out of these documents you know you get really bogged down every day into sort of processing these documents and getting them in there and making sure the metadata is correct and all this and then you get to hear about this life-changing research and it's just um it does my heart good so anyway thank you so much for coming out here today just a little background before I do a quick demo and it's gonna hopefully be really quick because we want to get to the more of the research stuff so you know by the numbers so today is our launch our official launch November 15 2018 thank you for being here we currently have 15 collections posted to the food industry and we're hoping of course to put many more in as time goes by we currently have as of today 159 thousand pages in a little over 32,000 documents and give us a couple months we're trying to double it so come back maybe in January and it should be doubled and you know to give you an idea of our capacity in terms of documents our tobacco area has a stand set over 90 million pages in close to 15 million documents so we have the capacity to grow this thing and grow it big and I'm super excited um so our ideal team is small but we are mighty it's myself or our head archivist Kate Tasker and we have two developers Rebecca tang and Sven Meyer and they get the documents into our archive and keep us running 24/7 365 um and that's pretty much it we've had help along the way and I'm so glad they're here DeeDee Kramer and Mimi Klausner you know have been a part of our team over the years and helped us a lot and so that's a little background I've had some questions lately about how we get documents into our archive and kind of why it takes so long so I thought I'd go over that really quickly I think people are more used to the scan a document put it on document cloud right so this is what happens with our archive especially with food where we've been calling the arts and paper archives which is a little bit different for us so we get a paper document we digitize it and create PDFs then we send the document out for indexing so this means that each document is actually read and described by a human who adds information to about 10 to 12 fields that we use for this archive title author document date people mentioned so it's fairly labor-intensive and quite costly but I think it makes for a really rich resource and we then OCR the document to provide full-text search and you know developers then run a script that looks for personal information that we'd want to redact and we try and do that proactively and then finally we add the PDF and its record to our site and then rebuild our index of 15 million documents and push it out live right so this all we do this on about a three to four week cycle and that's why it takes so long because it at scale it's you know we turn these OCR in software you know constantly sometimes and it goes about 800 pages an hour so that's how it goes and the end result of this is what we hope is a rich resource of easily findable documents so this is our shortcut URL you can go industry documents UCSF edu you can also do IDL at UCSF edu and that will get you to our main site so this is our main page this is the main industry documents library and you'll notice at the top there's all industries but underneath all industries lives all four of our archives currently which is tobacco drug chemical and food and I started when tobacco was still growing maybe 14 years ago I came to the IDL and since then we've also you know grown drug and chemical and now food and it's just it's so exciting to see all of these new areas grow all right let's see I'm gonna take you right to the food industry documents archive just in the interest of time so I want to draw your attention first of all just quickly to our upper right menu here's where you're just gonna find our content pages the help pages some research tools and this will grow as our ten gross we have a blog um you know but that'll grow as well so here you know right now what I want to show you or what I want to draw your attention to is our bibliography right so we keep a running list of citations of papers and publications that have been written using our documents right now because we just launched there's about five in here but I think that's pretty good for a lot actually you know and and this is really when using it as a primary resource no not just talking about the library but actually using our documents in the paper and you know so I know that we're going to grow just as a reference tobacco has almost nine hundred and ninety citations and it's still growing and a probably close to 800 of these are peer-reviewed journal articles so you know this definitely has the food industry documents it definitely has the capacity to grow the research as well we'll get there all right so back to the menu the last one I want to point out as our collections menu so this is actually a drop down menu and you'll see all 15 of our collections right now hopefully it's gonna start spanning across as we get more collections this is clickable so if you want to look at any of these collections you can go ahead and click on one of these this see what like I was saying earlier we do have an FTC children's advertising collection which has the public comments from that kid vid rulemaking from the FTC in the 70s so let's pretend we want to look at the robert shank papers you just click on that and you're taken to a collection page this collection page is gonna tell you a little bit about the documents you know why we collected them who this person is but it also has a search box that allows you to do sort of a quick browse of this particular collection if you just wanted to see the documents in this collection alright so let's do a little search now um you can in our Biggs we have a big search box it's kind of like a Google box um you can print just one term and you can just let that roll and see what comes back you can do a phrase and if you do more than one term together as a phrase you want to enclose them in quotes otherwise it'll search for every word separately you know hi and fructose and corn answer anywhere in the document so this will make sure that it comes back as a phrase you can also do a little bit more complicated boolean type searches so you could put a phrase together with some boolean operators and some parentheses and that type of thing and we can definitely handle that kind of query and if you have trouble with boolean operators can't remember what to use need help constructing a query we've got some tips for better results over here where it's a guide that'll pop up and it'll tell you sort of every operator you can use and then that's allowed on our site and sort of how to construct and what it means what'll come back alright so let's just use high fructose corn syrup as an example put that in and I'm just I'm searching right now across all food collections just as the default just just let it roll and see what happens now I know you can't read this this is too small but I wanted to give a visual of what a search result page would look like and to do it on a slide I had to kind of make it really small so this is what's gonna come back you're gonna get a bunch of records with thumbnails for the documents and some ability to narrow your results and fast it on the left so I'm gonna zero in on this first result so you'll notice that each document record has a fair amount of information there's probably twelve fields here that are filled out and I think this is what really sets our archive apart from other research resources it's the metadata right we're not just relying on full-text search that you get with OCR and we're coupling this with them with the metadata so this means potentially you can surface more relevant results on the Left you'll see it's kind of truncated right now it's cut off but if you were to keep scrolling you would see that we have the ability to narrow your results with faceting on the left so if you did like in tobacco if you did a fairly broad search and came up with a hundred and something thousand results you're gonna want to narrow it that's just that's too many to eyeball so you can narrow it by document type by brand by date so document dates and decades that type of thing but here we're just doing a really simple one so let's open this document you click on the title and it'll bring you to our document viewer so the PDF is in the center the metadata is on the right which is the information about the document and what I want to highlight for you quickly is some of the stuff around the PDF so on the very top you have pagination and the ways that you can size the PDF for readability because I know sometimes on laptops the window is very small there we have an option for brows and more like this and I love this feature this feature is amazing we didn't have this on our old site so this came about when we rebuilt now what this is is this Browse button gives you the ability to browse this collection back and forth from your primary document and sort of mimics the original order that we got it is so it's like pawing through a file folder in an archive and we try and keep it very much that way when we ingest it so that if you look back and forth like this it's an ax carousel view you'll be able to see the document that came before in the document that came after and after that and a lot of times there's some really relevant stuff that was intellectually filed together more like this is very much looks like the carousel as well but what it does is it surfaces similar documents for you that you may not have found with your particular search words so these are great I love these and so let's go back to the document quickly so say you like this document and you want to do something with it right so first off you can bookmark it and book market is really just saving the document for later it's like putting it in a shopping cart and that's the first icon the second icon is you can open it in your own browser window so it'll open it in a new tab because a lot of times people like to use their own browser window for printing and that type of thing and then you can download it to your computer so you can download the PDF from right there you can email it to yourself and you would be emailing the record of the document with the URL so you can always go back to it you want to email it to a friend colleague that kind of thing and then the final icon is citation so if you're working on a journal article or if you're just keeping records for yourself about documents that you want to use this will download the the citation and then you can upload it into endnote or refworks we're working on Zotero and you know either Excel you know text that kind of thing so we tried to make it as friendly as possible four different ways people want to get this document and use it see ya all right and so you've done your searching you've done about maybe you've you know saved bookmark about five documents and now you want to go and do something with those saved documents at the very bottom you will have a tab called bookmarks and you'll see there's a little number right there so I went and saved five and this is where you can then access these saved documents and do something with them you can email them you can download the citation that type of thing now I do want to say quickly that this will all if I were to do all of this work and then close my browser and leave if I came back those would be gone so they're they're only based they're only session based so I suggest if you're just doing some quick searches make sure you download everything before you leave our site because it will be gone except if you decide to have an account with us which I think everybody should so up in the very for the very right-hand corner is a little drop-down since my library and all in there's a login right there and all you do to create an account is put in an email nobody tracks anything nobody you know spammed you or anything like that it's really just to be able to have your own account for our site and that way once you're logged in anything you save is saved indefinitely and you can always come back to it so I suggest everybody do that and now I just quickly want to do one more search for you and I took us out to the all industries tab and really because I wanted to show like what Kim was talking about there is such an intersection between food and you know tobacco and drug and chemical in all of these industries and so I did a quick search for the phrase sugar Association and I just let it roll across all industries all four of our industries and I don't know how big this is up there but if you'll notice you know results came back in three out of our four Archives just for sugar Association so it looks like you know there's the majorities in food but there's about two hundred and seventy nine and tobacco and if you wanted to see just the tobacco ones you could click on that it would rerun it in tobacco and you can see all of those documents so I um and then I just finally after the site demo is done now I just wanted to say you know you're gonna have more questions once you start searching probably not now but once you start searching if you start searching you're gonna have questions and all you need to do to get a hold of us is this ask us link at the bottom of every single page and we we encourage people to ask us questions we love to help with searches we love to help with you know weird questions about what's in the documents so please ask us and follow us on Twitter thank you very much so we have a minute or two if anybody has any questions for Rachel have a question from the Twitter audience asking how can the public submit new articles to the database submit new papers so there is just go to the donate button at the bottom and you can donate documents to us and we can appraise them and see if they fit with our scope and you can also donate any funds to help process that collection looks like we're done it's a great pleasure to introduce to you Elissa EPEL who I mentioned earlier this morning who has been such a leader in the area of stress food and industry as well thank you what an amazing amazing event today what has been seen cannot be unseen this is a turning point for us it is my really deep honor and privilege to introduce Laura Schmidt Laura's a associa Laura's an interdisciplinary researcher she is a world leader in linking strategic research to policy especially in the food realm she's a professor at Institute for Health Policy and anthropology here let me give you an example of what has happened in the last few years laura has a gift of using research and insight passion and political savvy to talk to stakeholders to explain how urgent it is to rid our environment of liquid sugar of sugar beverages so she and her colleagues created a sales ban at UCSF you cannot buy a sugar beverage at any UCSF hospital or campus Thank You Laura so we evaluated this we jumped to put together a team we begged for some funding the leaders at UCSF saw the importance of this and we have a paper under review of the first sales ban showing that we actually created a health disparity intervention we helped the most socially disadvantaged staff and workers at UCSF in a dramatic way with their intake and their adiposity and they were grateful they wanted this this is now a clinical trial run by Jamie Schmidt who's here out of this at the Sutter Hospitals we have a randomized multi-site clinical trial led by Laura that stemmed from this so we are going to be demonstrating how some of these changes are can improve public health someone recently asked me what's the most compassionate study you've done compassionate so I study meditation so obviously I would probably talk about a study that directly trained us to feel how were connected to other people to feel empathy et cetera my answer was that it was this study that I was so honored to do with Laura Schmidt it is far past time that we stopped teaching fish to try to swim and clean out the toxins from their water we are so last comment Laura Schmidt and my colleagues here are doing this work their life is not easy they are under threat they are intimidated by the greed of people who want to make profit at the expense of Public Health creating diabetes and obesity but my Laura and my colleagues march on they will not be silenced thank you so much for your work Laura [Applause] I'm gonna get her to introduce me from now on we've been working on this archive for a while and with the help of all Stan and this whole group Kim Kristen and now we're launching it and I want to close out by talking about how even before the archive how documents research has really move the dial on policy and public opinion and the ways that this kind of work can have a real-world impact and to encourage everyone in the room and everyone listening online to join us in doing this kind of work whether you're a middle school student or a policy person journalist join us in doing this kind of work because it's impactful so to start with I want to just remind us of what's at stake here I'm going to show you a moving graphic of the fattening of the planet Earth so this is a comparison between 1980 and 1985 across the globe showing you increases in obesity rates in various countries so already China's 1.6 increase now here we go mm so the areas in red are are up to a six times increase six fold increase in obesity rates compared to 1980 and here we are in 2015 72 countries around the world have experienced a doubling of obesity rates within their assistive populations so I sometimes refer to this as the global warming of Public Health so how does the industry respond to this this is this is actually from one of Marion's books it's a it's a coke marketing executive who's says our Achilles heel is the discussion about obesity and this is 2007 before it got even worse it's gone from a small manageable us issue to a huge global issue it dilutes our marketing and it works against us it's a huge huge issue so I was trained one of my areas of training it was in public health and I was trained that when you have an epidemic the first thing you want to do is you want to understand the disease vector where is this disease coming from and you want to understand and that's the first step in stopping the epidemic so where's the outbreak coming from and why so right now we still have outbreaks of malaria in parts of Africa so epidemiologists go to the source they try to find the mosquitoes where are the mosquitoes breeding where are the puddles where the mosquitoes breed and then that helps them find the kids and they put a mosquito net on the kids closest to the disease vector right to protect them it's basic public health so it's no different when you have a chronic disease epidemic obesity driven diseases like type 2 diabetes heart disease stroke dental caries it's no different you have you have to look at the vector and in this case the vector is not mosquitoes the vector is food and beverage companies so industry documents are really about helping us understand the vector right there about looking inside the industry and understanding what are they up to why are they doing what they're doing and what are they gonna do next where are they gonna go next which emerging market in this world are they going to go to next and market their products and so that's really in a big picture that's the value of industry documents work so I'm going to talk about three what I think are three really cool examples of ways that documents have really shifted debates and changed hearts and minds and the first is around in its revealing industry involvement in the scientific enterprise and you'll see came up before the International Life Sciences Institute but I want to give this as an example a lot of people will look I took this as a screenshot off of the LC website right this looks like a pretty nice organization they're bringing scientists together to improve environmental sustainability and human health hey I'm all I'm all about that hire me right well it turns out and this is a big organization 616 branches all around the world operating the global the national and thus and in regional levels so ill see turns out to be sponsored by corporations coca-cola and food and beverage corporations currently are big donors and it is essentially a scientific front group it's all about producing science as Marian talked about that will favour scientific interest industry interests one of the big concerns that I have about ill see in particular is that I've seen journalists and I've seen peer-reviewed papers in the scientific literature where I suspect the person doing the reporting or the or the peer review didn't really understand what ill see is and so these articles from ill C get published in in mainstream scientific journals and are treated as credible so we have I mean Rachel didn't get didn't do a search on LC across all the documents but you can be sure we have a lot of them in the archive and one of my hopes is that people will start looking more and more about LC and sharing that with the public so that more and more people can understand what what they're really about and this isn't the only one the obesity society there are a number that are there not just what Marian described organizations that have a lot of corporate interests these are solely funded by corporations another example is where where we've really gotten some traction this goes back to the work of on Ahad O'Connor at the New York Times a really wonderful journalist and Marian mentioned the global energy balance Network which is a major coke funded coca-cola nothing the Koch brothers coke coke funded scientific effort designed to show that you exercise basically that you can exercise away an unhealthy diet and this really dovetails nicely with a marketing platform of coca-cola which is basically you can drink our product in mean as you know maintain it within the context of an active healthy lifestyle and so in August 2015 dr. James Hill he's a professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine was approached and denied that Coke that a 1.5 million dollar donation to his lab was by coca-cola was actually you know driving his research findings and had any patently deny that it had any influence over his research on Ahad went ahead and did some Freedom of Information requests and showed in dr. Hills own words with coca-cola how influential the the corporation was now here's where where there was real world impact the University of Colorado gave the money back to coca-cola okay pretty cool so this is an example of how documents allow the scientific enterprise to do a better job at policing itself I just want to point out and this is in Marian's book and also in in some publications by Gary Ruskin that after this whole event coca-cola said okay we're gonna Bala SH the global energy balance Network and everybody in the public health community said okay you know that's that's a good thing however they have this other project is coal which is doing the same thing globally and you know I've worked on World Health Organization projects and this thing has the scale and scope of a w-h-o multi-site study 12 sites they're studying children to determine that physical inactivity is the cause of childhood obesity all over the world so it's not over yet we also have documents that are shedding light on in dealth officials who have deep ties to industry so this is Brenda Fitzgerald and up until January of this year she was the director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention the CDC in charge of public health at the federal level and this is a screen grab I took off the coca-cola website and that's Brenda so she worked extensively with the company and once again as you can see around this marketing platform that you can exercise away a childhood obesity and you can exercise away an unhealthy diet now in January she stepped down from the CDC but that was because she had some ties to tobacco a tobacco company however before that point russ green at crossfit who was mentioned earlier and others had been doing Freedom of Information requests that had revealed her ties to coke and shed light on that so great stuff around clearing out scientific conflicts of interest now a second way that I think that we can the documents really help the the the real world is by shedding light on industries next steps helping policymakers to anticipate what will come next and Marian mentioned the DC leaks documents and this actually comes out of that collection it's in the in the in the archive so anyone here anyone with an internet connection anywhere in the world can just download this document if they want to really take a good solid look at it but essentially this one is the coca-cola game plan for the European Union what they're gonna do and and on the y-axis the vertical one what you're seeing is their assessment of the impact on their profit margins if these policies that are all the little dots in the in the in the diagram comes to fruition in Europe and along the x-axis is the likelihood that they think it will materialize so highlighted in yellow the thing that they are think is most likely to materialize and also will have the biggest impact on their profit margins guess what soda taxes right up there and there and you can see they're saying we're gonna fight back hard on that one so what I found interesting when I looked at this document is that every time I'm seeing the this company or the whole beverage associations platform on soda taxes they're saying soda taxes don't work they don't bring down consumption but my question is why would they be so worried about the business impact if soda taxes didn't work and they didn't bring down consumption so a little closer to home now I don't have the notoriety or name recognition of marion Nestle however I indirectly did sort of appear in the documents in the DC leaked documents and this is just a portion of one of the documents and here you have monitoring by the corporation of activities at the state of California level Assemblyman bloom who I have supported as a pro bono scientific adviser and you have the city of San Francisco who I also supported the Board of Supervisors in thinking about how the evidence lines up with soda taxation and that's my indirect connection to the coke documents and so I put in red what what this is is this is an inform document which means they're letting everybody know what the company's up to and it says the California Beverage Association has got it covered when it comes to a soda tax in the state of California and in San Francisco they say and this I found interesting they say the coalition ground work is already underway in Oakland because Oakland wound up announcing a soda tax and both passed and in the 2016 ballot we but we're all over Oakland and what I found interesting about this document is that this was an April 4th 2016 document and I happen to know that the Oakland soda tax wasn't even announced yet so again documents can help you understand and anticipate what's going to come next right it's good so while we're on the subject of soda taxes I want everyone to appreciate and this document by the way is a really long one and it's every country all over the world I mean it goes on and on what they're up to in every country around soda taxes but I want people to appreciate that they were right it was very likely that soda taxes would materialize their game plan was correct and so far we've got 33 countries or 35 regions and countries that have passed soda taxes soda taxes that have been shown to work so I think that's good news and that's very important for us to bear in mind finally the third way that I think that documents help shape public opinion is is by shaping public opinion about the product and its industry and when you shape public opinion when public opinion changes a couple of things happen one thing is consumers vote with their feet and they say you know I really don't like this company so I don't think I'm gonna support them with my MA my dollars the other thing that happens is that it emboldened politicians and policy makers to regulate the industry because their constituents are asking for that so I want to it one of the things that's a little bit frustrating about working in the public health field is that as soon as we battle against industries to bring home public basic public health infrastructure are so hard-won by advocates and policymakers and yet as soon as they as they happen it's just the new normal right and so how quickly we forget that you could buy cigarettes in the 1950s at bedside in our very hospitals on this case us right and now we just take it for granted that we're gonna be able to breathe clean air indoors okay III have a response to seatbelts airbags right we've got lots of examples motorcycle helmets is another one in every case public health advocates fought hard against an industry that didn't want to get regulated and in every case we take it for granted that people's lives are going to be saved as a result of that effort and so this is a it's frustrating for public health folks but it's also a really rewarding thing when you see the norms change because that means people smoke less people get sick less right so – so you know what documents research is really able to do and I think this is a long-term change this is not a short-term change although we've already seen evidence that it's changing around the food issue it's it's that it shifts attitudes and norms over time this is a you know right now the e-cigarette debate and kids is a really really big issue threatening a whole generation of children and this is an example of denormalization the tobacco industry as a kid's menu bubblegum cigarettes the same thing is happening in the food area this is a wonderful image from Dean schillingers group Dean and and the New York City Health Department if I had time I'd show you the whole advertisement are you pouring on the pounds so what a wonderful image of normative change comes out of the bottle of soda and it goes into the glasses body fat that'll that'll stick with you right okay so three of probably many others but three ways the documents make a difference in this in this world so this is our closing our closing of the meeting and I to encourage everyone here to think about using the documents Rachel Rachel taught us all how I learned a few things who remember presentation and so it's it's open to anyone with an internet connection and we really want people to make use of this amazing public good thank you [Applause] should people hold on we're gonna have a little a little bye-bye hi there the the US intelligence community has determined that DC leaks is a front for the same group that hacked into John Podesta Z mail and we also know that they're engaging in propaganda experts propaganda campaigns specifically in the anti-vaccine oh that if they undermine our public health that way they can make us sick as a country I don't think they would do the same thing for for the diet industry but have you seen any kind of evidence of manipulation of those documents for political reasons really interesting question and not to my knowledge a Marion do you political distortion of the DC leaks document a distortion of the DC leaks documents for political ends they're gone yeah she's right they're gone if I'm sorry if the library hadn't didi hadn't snapped him up we wouldn't have him stan has a well so that's and that's an interesting question and I mentioned in my remarks that the original box of documents that I got was about four or five thousand pages which were purloined from the tobacco industry and then in response the cigarette company said oh these are misleading and they released another four or five thousand pages which was actually the original collection the library put up and the interesting thing was if you the four or five thousand pages the industry released if you looked at them all by themselves it kind of exonerated them but if you put them together with the four or five thousand pages I had the pieces fit together and you got a much clearer picture of all the naughty things they were doing so I do think you raised an interesting issue and I think if that is the case and coca-cola and and these other industry groups want to release more of their internal documents so that we can have a clearer view of what's going on I'm sure the library would be more than happy to ingest them and in fact Jule you know Laura talked about the the e-cigarette problem they came and met with us a while ago because they're based here in San Francisco and they said well we would love to make our internal research public and I said we would love you to give it to us but they haven't given it to us yeah John just a comment as a as a longtime user of the library the synergy of having all these different things in there is really incredible all right I mean I study climate denial and the people who do that and you see them you know I I routinely put somebody's name in here and they pop up okay like like the cig the Philip Morris executive who is a VP of Marketing for cloud coal okay all right here's a good one if you put in Exxon into the tobacco section you get 20,000 hits okay right that turns out I think to be because so many cigarettes are sold through gas stations but that's a kind of thing you see again that the aggregation of the different industry stuff is really powerful yeah John you make a really good point and I do think that there are some entities some of these front groups like ill see for example seems to me like kind of a wall a clearinghouse for corporate funded research and I don't know if the carbon people are in elsi or not but there are ways and I think this has been our experience Kim Kim and I in Casey Palmer as well working in the in the tobacco archive on food when we started out we thought we had 30,000 documents now Kim is like I have no idea how much we've got it could be like a million literally and because the more you look the more you see and we haven't even gotten out of Phillip Morris and our jr. those collections and into you know the European tackle tobacco companies in the UK and so forth and so I think it will become a situation where the more you look the more you find and we and this beginning effort to look across industries is going to become gonna reveal a lot and it's so wonderful that be able to cross search so these these document libraries can be connected and I think carbon may be next this is clearly a tremendous undertaking that you guys have compiled this resource and it's gonna take a lot of expertise to utilize it well what will help you most quickly in this endeavor well I wouldn't say it as as boldly as Dan would he said money I would say Phil support support in all manner I think documents as well as well as funny funding for the library because you know a lot of our research funded through NIH and NIH doesn't really fund a lot of infrastructure development and certainly something like this which is a global public good I mean we're it's it's something it's a very unusual resource and so having a basic endowment for the library to continue to to I mean there are a number of collections that the library has even gotten authorizations for that we don't have the resources to collect and digitize and put online Laura this question was actually asked earlier but I think it I wanted to get your take on it so what's the perspective for preventing and reversing the preemption of soda taxes at the local levels okay so what dr. Kimber Stanhope is asking is that it's a kind of wonky issue which is that it's possible at every level of government all the way up to the global level for a larger governmental entity say a state to pass a law that makes it constrains the ability of a locality anything under it to say pass the soda tax and that this is a strategy that my colleague dr. Eric Crosby and I and Dean Schillinger have just written about this is happening it was honed by the tobacco companies but it's really a kind of generic strategy used by a lot of different industries from the gun control or gun lobby to and now soda taxes so in the United States in areas where there was local action to pass a soda tax as in California where five Bay Area cities decided that they wanted to do that the American Beverage Association came in and it did a sort of eleventh-hour backroom Sunday afternoon deal with the California senators to pass a law that says no more soda taxes in the state across the 50 some-odd counties hunt over a hundred municipalities and many were prepared to do that and so this can happen at any level of government so currently in the in the renegotiations of the NAFTA treaty there are efforts to get that kind of language in there around front of package labeling warning labels such as in Chile that warned parents that the cereal isn't good for your kid so this is a challenge and and the question was how do we stop it I was because a lot of people put a lot of energy in the Bay Area into into working on this issue and yeah it's it's a definite setback for public health in the tobacco area Erik estimates that for every state preemption law it took about eleven years for the advocacy community to roll it back so it's a big it's a big challenge for to public health and the the my best hope is that Michelle Obama they go low we go high they go low they they go to the state we go to the federal level or we go to the state level you know or whoever yeah so we're gonna have one last question for Laura and then we're gonna have all the panelists come up we're gonna have general discussion and this last question goes to Robert Lustig Laura you know where I get on most of what's been talked about this morning from all the speakers has been about sugar as the you know primary culprit but we know that sugar is just the tip of the iceberg there's way more there's the issue of trans fats there's the issue genetically modified organism foods in addition there's the question of how does food impact the other public health things that we're talking about like climate change you know agriculture is 30% of climate change it seems to me that we now have the capability and the cross-indexing and metadata to be able to link these issues stand started with you know it was about breathing clean air do we have plans to shall we say expand this into something even bigger going forward is the is the question do we plan to look at other industries yeah I think oh yeah I mean the main issue is is documents and funding the more the better the more more pieces of the puzzle you've got the easier it is to solve it everyone raise your hand if you have a question I want to see okay okay great so we will start over here quick so just to add one more thing to Laura's answer to rob this this resource is there it's free and I think Rob you should just start going in and answering your questions and I'm not saying that I'm not saying that in a flippant way because as I said once we put the tobacco documents up there by making them available to everyone in the world people came and looked at things and did things that we would have never had not not just not had the resources to do we would have never even thought to do so I think all of you when you go home go to IDL UCSF dot edu and type in your favorite word and start reading so I want to first of all thank all of the presenters and Claire especially for putting this together because it was a great expose I suppose and a great description of a new resource but sitting here and sort of taking the ten thousand foot view the these tactics that have been used by these industries are not focused only on sugar only on tobacco it's sort of what's created the assault on science in general that we're seeing today and I wonder if you want to react because everybody's doing creating controversy there is no controversy about vaccines there's no controversy about global warning more warming but the industries have taken this on so I just wonder if you could comment on this general tactic that the PR companies have given to us well okay yes you're right and and in fact there been there was a book published a few years ago called the Republican war on science which is mostly based on the documents weren't the book merchants of doubt' which is mostly by global warming and led to the movie there's a lot based on the documents and you know I the the these are I mean I think anybody working in this space is one way or another addressing that issue and I think the more again the more people who dig around and here looking for those kind of questions the more we're gonna see and it's at least going to become harder for them to do it I just wanted to say that I actually agree I think the public relations industry is probably the most unscrutinized industry out of all of those that we've been talking about here today and that's where I think we're gonna find the most important information that's going to inform us moving forward so I'd like to see us really you talking about that industry more specifically and the documents have a lot of material on PR firms and some of them were shared by multiple industries exactly right yeah I just plan a suggestion those of you who are from the industry who are here or listening I want to plant the seed of how much more impact you could have by joining this effort as an insider make your life count at the grave what are you gonna be thinking about it's not the car you're driving okay I'll stop so any any last comments on science how sorry yep I was just very taken by the person who talked about teaching young students about this and I was wondering whether the university has done yet or has gotten anybody in the education world to create a segment of materials for you know the high school problems of American democracy class or maybe even for undergraduate you know government classes that utilize this and sort of teach about truth finding and and truth in science when they designed the website the redesigned it they some of the testing was done on high school students right make it accessible to them and while I don't we haven't specifically matter about the other people here we haven't specifically done that but there are teachers who have and we've and the tobacco collection we do an annual training for like real people and sometimes teachers do show up and I know that they're planning similar things for the food collection do you want anything no I just you know we that's a great idea and it's something we have batted around for years we just haven't had the the personnel capacity to do it yet but we have been talking for years now there's been different teachers in the Bay Area and beyond that would ask us for help with their curriculum and so over the years we have dealt with teachers but we haven't made our own curriculum yet so great ideas there's there's room for everyone to be contributing this cause we get one last question from the back so with respect to changing the with respect to changing the narrative and getting a step ahead of the industry with in policy making how do you deal with just the sheer amount of money that they have even if we have information on our as the policymakers side for example in the Washington preemption ballot initiative that's come up a couple of times for soda taxes which they dubbed grocery taxes I think the spending differential was twenty million dollars funded fully by the beverage industry to a hundred thousand dollars it seems really hard to get philanthropy to step in and it thought just seems like an almost insurmountable challenge well III the microphone was handed to me so I I guess I have to answer it I think this I think the soda taxes are a really good example the soda industry has put hundreds of millions of dollars literally into fighting the soda taxes and yet soda consumption is way down it's been declining since 1990 it continues to decline and just despite the money so the word is that the public health word is out that sugary drinks aren't good for you and you just keep trying to do that in whatever area you're working on and hope that eventually it gets traction but that's one example where it's working at least in this country I really think that's an excellent question and I think that one of our allies are going to be health insurance companies and health providers because as we become responsible under accountable care organizations where we are responsible for a panel of patients and keeping them out of the healthcare system that some of the perverse incentives that we've had in the past are not going to be as effective I mean you know it's true that the soda people won in Washington but they did lose in Oregon and here in San Francisco after the city passed the ban on the sale of law flavored tobacco products r.j. Reynolds came in and spent 12 million dollars in a city of 750,000 people trying to get it overturned at the ballot and they got 32 percent of the vote they got crushed now that was because if somebody mentioned slant you know the groups like Michael Bloomberg and and the campaign for tobacco-free kids and the Heart Association the Cancer Society and others absolutely put money in and while the tobacco interests way outspent the people supporting the flavor band if you have enough money to get your message out there the fact that there's way out spending you doesn't matter so yeah there's some evidence from the early evaluations of the bay area soda taxes the consumption started to go down before the tax even took effect and that's probably a symbolic effect of the policy debate and one of the kind of things that rolls around in my brain is does the incredible investment of money in robocalling people I mean in Berkeley I think it was almost 100 bucks a person for every resident that lives there yeah and and every BART station every bus is plastered with these no on e measure E or whatever that that and calling it a grocery tax and people know it's not at a certain point the public starts to say what's up with this why are they spending so much money maybe I should look into this and at least I know from living in the Bay Area as these taxes were going down people would say you know they my mailman said you know oh that's BS you know it's no grocery tax yeah so I I do think that it may actually be a maybe shooting themselves in the foot because it makes people wonder about why are they fighting so hard in fact the the if you go back and look at the history of tobacco the tobacco industry beat back two initiatives on Clean Indoor Air in 1978 in 1980 which were by today's standards dick you lessly week and that is what engaged the public and laid the foundation for what's happened now and with answer to Kimber's question about the state preemption I mean that was just a law the Legislature passed and I don't understand why the health groups aren't going up there and making them repeal it it's very simple on that simple but hard note I'd like to thank our amazing speakers for their absolutely critical timely work thank you so much and thank you everyone for staying to the end hearing this first unveiling think about what you're going to do the speakers are here to talk to you now for a few minutes and I'm going to hand it to our host of the day the amazing Claire Brandis thank you so much for putting so much time and care into this so important thank you so much and I want to thank the panel members but I also want [Laughter] [Applause] really worked hard on this and really should have been one of the speaker studious without Claire's commitment on all of this this just wouldn't have happened it takes a village I also want to thank J Sullivan and Beth you and Samantha for their tremendous contributions for how well the stay went to me the theme of the day is unveiling is really bringing transparency at transparency to this very complex topic to really educate everyone in different dimensions using social media using the press using advocacy and community groups it's really going to be a very long-term battle but we're in it together and I'm very optimistic that we're gonna make great great progress so thank you everyone for coming and joining in our community we will be sending a follow-up on a link to today's presentation so we hope that you will share it with others and we really invite you to use this incredible resource and I'm so grateful to our library and to all the librarian archivists etc who have made this happen so thank you so much [Applause] you

Free Update Content with TwoDollarsTwenty | Cities: Skylines Industries Tutorial Part 7



g'day guys tell us 20 here and welcome back to City skylines industries this is gonna be the last tutorial from me and I'm gonna spend it looking at the new content that comes with the free updates I'm gonna start by checking out the new toll booths which will raise extra revenue for the city however will also create extra congestion on the roads so to avoid this only replacing them around the outskirts of the city you can find the toll booths in the road section under the very own tab and there's four to choose from I'm placing mine on a three lane highway so I'm gonna choose the four lane toll booth and place two going in either direction once I've done that I'm gonna waste my money placing down some trees and then I can actually change the price of the tickets when I click on the building and use the slider to decrease or increase the ticket price another cool feature with the free update is the ability to make buildings historical you can make a building historical by clicking on it and then clicking the historical building button and this would mean the building will continue to level up by won't actually change its appearance I'm gonna do this around my downtown to keep the skyline looking quite prominent and the rest of the buildings much lower down and I'm also gonna do this for buildings that I just like the look of and when I keep that look in the city the last feature I want to talk about is something that is quite interesting and allies within the map theme editor and this feature allows you to create custom name lists for your map theme the really cool thing about this is you can really customize the names of pretty much anything that spawns in your city ranging from industrial buildings to commercial buildings to people to districts you really have a lot of freedom making these names and I think it's going to make for some really interesting and unique map themes down the track but guys that is it for these tutorials I really had a lot of fun exploring the new industries DLC and I just want to say big thanks to Paradox Interactive for asking me to collaborate with them I hope these tutorials are been useful and I look forward to seeing your creations in the near future I'll see you later

Assemble a Manufacturer-filled Syringe



[Applause] in this video I will describe how to assemble a manufacturer filled syringe manufacturer filled syringes are available for a variety of vaccines CDC recommends that providers prepare vaccines just prior to administration providers should prepare vaccines in a designated area that is not adjacent to any area where potentially contaminated items are placed before preparing or administering any vaccine always start with proper hand hygiene CDC has hand-washing guidelines and resources for healthcare personnel available online begin by removing the manufacturer filled syringe from the storage unit then gather the appropriate supplies including the correct needle length engaged if it is not supplied by the manufacturer verify the vaccine you are preparing matches the standing order or the providers order then check the expiration date on the vaccine if applicable check the expiration date of the needle never administer expired vaccine or use expired equipment next open the needle be careful not to touch the inside of the packaging once opened place the packaging inside up on the counter the needle should rest on the inside of the packaging do not touch the hub of the needle the hub is where the needle attaches to the syringe pick up the syringe and shake it to mix the vaccine check the vaccine to make sure it is thoroughly mixed make sure there is no discoloration or precipitate do not administer vaccine that is discolored contains particulate matter or is not thoroughly mixed carefully remove the cap from the tip of the syringe hold the needle by its protective cap and attach the needle by twisting it onto the tip of the syringe twist the needle and syringe together until you can no longer turn the needle or you hear a click it is not necessary to remove the small amount of air in the manufacturer filled syringe now recheck the expiration date and the vaccine against the order finally if the manufacturer has not already labeled the vaccine identify the prepared vaccine this can be done by writing on the syringe or applying a label the vaccine is now ready to administer a syringe or a needle should always be discarded whenever sterility is compromised or questionable never use contaminated equipment to administer vaccine if the unprotected tip of a manufacturer filled syringe is touched or contaminated during the assembly process discard the syringe and the vaccine into either a biohazard or a sharps container if only the needle is contaminated the vaccine does not need to be discarded if the uncapped needle or a needle hub is touched or contaminated at any time discard the needle into a sharps container obtain a new sterile needle and start the process again this video is part of a series designed to demonstrate vaccine administration skills and best practices the video series is available on the vaccine administration webpage on the CDC vaccines and immunizations website at WWDC gov slash vaccines you